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Is there a good way to check a form input using regex to make sure it is a proper style email address? Been searching since last night and everybody that has answered peoples questions regarding this topic also seems to have problems with it if it is a subdomained email address.

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2  
possible duplicate of Checking validity of email in django/python –  larsmans Nov 5 '11 at 19:14

9 Answers 9

up vote 54 down vote accepted

There is no point. Even if you can verify that the email address is syntactically valid, you'll still need to check that it was not mistyped, and that it actually goes to the person you think it does. The only way to do that is to send them an email and have them click a link to verify.

Therefore, a most basic check (e.g. that they didn't accidentally entered their street address) is usually enough. Something like: it has exactly one @ sign, and at least one . in the part after the @:

[^@]+@[^@]+\.[^@]+

You'd probably also want to disallow whitespace -- there are probably valid email addresses with whitespace in them, but I've never seen one, so the odds of this being a user error are on your side.

If you want the full check, have a look at this question.


Update: Here's how you could use any such regex:

import re

if not re.match(r"... regex here ...", email):
  # whatever

Note the r in front of the string; this way, you won't need to escape things twice.

If you have a large number of regexes to check, it might be faster to compile the regex first:

import re

EMAIL_REGEX = re.compile(r"... regex here ...")

if not EMAIL_REGEX.match(email):
  # whatever
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So than basically my best bet would be if not re.match("[^@]+@[^@]+\.[^@]+", email): ? –  Bobby Nov 5 '11 at 19:15
    
Updated to show some usage examples. –  Thomas Nov 5 '11 at 19:19
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I ended up doing if not re.match(r"^[A-Za-z0-9\.\+_-]+@[A-Za-z0-9\._-]+\.[a-zA-Z]*$", email): as this seem the most plausible scenario followed by sending an verification email to the given address. –  Bobby Nov 5 '11 at 19:44
    
+1 for the quickie re.match(r"xx") tutorial. Inlining what is necessary is the mark of a good answer. –  JohnnyLambada Nov 17 '12 at 15:58
7  
@Bobby: please loosen that up a lot. I've had to deal with email addresses that that would filter out (e.g. with /, seen in a University's addresses). Another whole class that you're entirely blocking are internationalised domain names. Really, there's no good reason to block valid email addresses. I'll begrudgingly forgive people that don't allow email addresses like 100%." foo b@r"(this is a cool email address!)@(just a tld)com(ok), but I think the check for an @ symbol is really all you should have (a top level domain is valid as the domain part, but it's improbable). –  Chris Morgan Mar 6 '13 at 6:30
import re
def email():
    email = raw_input("enter the mail address::")
     match = re.search(r'[\w.-]+@[\w.-]+.\w+', email)

    if match:
        print "valid email :::", match.group()
    else:
        print "not valid:::"

email()
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if re.match(r"^[a-zA-Z0-9._]+\@[a-zA-Z0-9._]+\.[a-zA-Z]{3,}$", email)!=None:

    return 'Valid email.'

return 'Invalid email.' 
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1  
That wouldn't allow any country top level domains (.us, .de, .ch ...) and the often occuring - in domain name. Quick fix: "^[a-zA-Z0-9._-]+\@[a-zA-Z0-9._-]+\.[a-zA-Z]{2,}$" But don't do this, you should really consult the top answer. –  RafiK Jul 9 at 9:15

Apart from regex check, this can be included.

https://pypi.python.org/pypi/validate_email/1.0 Works like charm.

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Email addresses are not as simple as they seem! For example, Bob_O'Reilly+tag@example.com, is a valid email address.

I've had some luck with the lepl package (http://www.acooke.org/lepl/). It can validate email addresses as indicated in RFC 3696: http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc3696.html

Found some old code:

import lepl.apps.rfc3696
email_validator = lepl.apps.rfc3696.Email()
if not email_validator("email@example.com"):
    print "Invalid email"
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perfect answer! also works great! –  karantan Jan 15 '13 at 15:13
6  
lepl has now been discontinued. –  user290043 Jan 22 '13 at 13:07
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For a simple use case like this, if the current version works the fact it's discontinued is not very relevant. –  Vinko Vrsalovic Jul 4 '13 at 17:32

The Python standard library comes with an e-mail parsing function: email.util.parseaddr().

It returns a two-tuple containing the real name and the actual address parts of the e-mail:

>>> from email.utils import parseaddr
>>> parseaddr('foo@example.com')
('', 'foo@example.com')

>>> parseaddr('Full Name <full@example.com>')
('Full Name', 'full@example.com')

>>> parseaddr('"Full Name with quotes and <weird@chars.com>" <weird@example.com>')
('Full Name with quotes and <weird@chars.com>', 'weird@example.com')

And if the parsing is unsuccessful, it returns a two-tuple of empty strings:

>>> parseaddr('[invalid!email]')
('', '')

An issue with this parser is that it's accepting of anything that is considered as a valid e-mail address for RFC-822 and friends, including many things that are clearly not addressable on the wide Internet:

>>> parseaddr('invalid@example,com') # notice the comma
('', 'invalid@example')

>>> parseaddr('invalid-email@example')
('', 'invalid-email@example')

So, as @TokenMacGuy put it, the only definitive way of checking an e-mail address is to send an e-mail to the expected address and wait for the user to act on the information inside the message.

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4  
This is such a crap. 'retard' is a valid email address according to it. According to RFC it is, as it's a local user. However for 99.99999999999% of the users this is not what they want. So don't use this for validation, unless you allow local, on-server deliveries.... BTW, the module is email.utils (plural), the link clarifies it. –  Peter Lada Jan 12 at 5:48
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@PeterLada: You could just check if there's a @ in the address after using this func, though. –  bvukelic Jun 26 at 19:16

The only really accurate way of distinguishing real, valid email addresses from invalid ones is to send mail to it. What counts as an email is surprisingly convoluted ("John Doe" <john.doe@example.com>" actually is a valid email address), and you most likely want the email address to actually send mail to it later. After it passes some basic sanity checks (such as in Thomas's answer, has an @ and at least one . after the @), you should probably just send an email verification letter to the address, and wait for the user to follow a link embedded in the message to confirm that the email was valid.

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Email addresses are incredibly complicated. Here's a sample regex that will match every RFC822-valid address: http://www.ex-parrot.com/pdw/Mail-RFC822-Address.html

You'll notice that it's probably longer than the rest of your program. There are even whole modules for Perl with the purpose of validating email addresses. So you probably won't get anything that's 100% perfect as a regex while also being readable. Here's a sample recursive descent parser: http://cpansearch.perl.org/src/ABIGAIL/RFC-RFC822-Address-2009110702/lib/RFC/RFC822/Address.pm

but you'll need to decide whether you need perfect parsing or simple code.

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This is typically solved using regex. There are many variations of solutions however. Depending on how strict you need to be, and if you have custom requirements for validation, or will accept any valid email address.

See this page for reference: http://www.regular-expressions.info/email.html

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