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Let's say I have a:

class A {
    A(int i);
};

class B : A {
};

I cannot instanciate B(3) for instance, as this constructor is not defined. Is there a way to instanciate a B object that would use the A constructor, without having to add "trivial" code in all derived classes? thanks

thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

C++11 has a way:

class A {
public:
    A(int i);
};

class B : A {
public:
    using A::A; // use A's constructors
};
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For completeness: and it's impossible in C++03. –  Cat Plus Plus Nov 5 '11 at 19:45
1  
Weehoo. I didn't realize constructor forwarding enabled that. +1 This is sweet for template meta-programming too –  sehe Nov 5 '11 at 19:47
    
@sehe Yeah. Too bad only Clang supports it right now. –  Pubby Nov 5 '11 at 19:49
    
@Pubby8: that must be the reason I hadn't found out yet! –  sehe Nov 5 '11 at 19:50

If you're using C++03 this is the best thing I can think of in your situation:

class A {
public:
    A(int x) { ... }
};

class B : public A {
public:
    B(int x) : A(x) { ... }
}

You may also want to check out the link below, which is a C# question but contains a more detailed answer regarding why constructors can act this way:

C# - Making all derived classes call the base class constructor

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as user491704 said it should be something like this

class mother {
public:
 mother (int a)
 {}
 };

class son : public mother {
public:
 son (int a) : mother (a)
 { }
   };

Here is a link for the Tutorial

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