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So, I've tried break, next and return. They all give errors, exit of course works, but that completely exits. So, how would one end a case...when "too soon?"

Example:

case x
    when y; begin
        <code here>
        < ** terminate somehow ** > if something
        <more code>
    end
end

(The above is some form of pseudo-code just to give the general idea of what I'm asking [begin...end was used with the hope that break would work].

And, while I'm at it, is there a more elegant way of passing blocks to case...when?

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just re-structure your logic - see below –  Tilo Nov 5 '11 at 20:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I see a couple of possible solutions. At the first hand, you can define your block of instructions inside some method:

def test_method
  <code here>
  return if something
  <more code>
end

case x
  when y
    test_method
end

At the other hand, you can use catch-throw, but I believe it's more uglier and non-ruby way :)

catch :exit do
  case x
    when y
      begin
        <code here>
        throw :exit if something
        <more code>
      end
  end
end
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Well, if I created a method for every case it would look weird, really weird (and there's a lot of cases) and the second example does look a bit... Eh. +1 for creativity, though. –  destiel starship Nov 5 '11 at 20:16
    
but wait, that return only returns from the method and doesn't break the case statement, right? –  Michael K Madison Jun 26 '13 at 17:27

What's wrong with:

case x
when y;
    <code here>
    if !something
        <more code>
    end
end

Note that if !something is the same as unless something

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Absolutely nothing! It did cross my mind, but I was looking for the right way of doing it. I assumed there was a right way, apart from this one. So, if there's no other way of doing it, I guess this is the right way. Thanks! :D –  destiel starship Nov 5 '11 at 20:14
    
Wrong is indentation. If it wasn't wrong, then the language won't need at all neither break nor next. –  Nakilon Feb 18 '13 at 19:06

Here's an answer similar to the technique WarHog gave:

case x
when y
    begin
        <code here>
        break if something
        <more code>
    end while false
end

or if you prefer:

case x
when y
    1.times do
        <code here>
        break if something
        <more code>
    end
end
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