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I am creating a client-server application in java which will allow a number of people, using a client side swing application, (a notepad) to connect to a server. Once connected, each client will have to request control of the notepad so they can edit it, and then relinquish control, sending their result to be displayed on the pad of all other clients.

The main problem i am having is the multi-threaded server logic, using the main server instance and several threads, each one handling communication with a client.

I am unsure whether the structure i have chosen will work or whether there will be some issue involved with my lack of understanding of how threads work, causing data corruption or some other thread related issue.

anyway, this is the server code, i was wondering if anyone could tell me if this system will work without error? There is of course more logic to add, like a cap on number of connections, a waiting list for the lock, etc. but i am mainly concerned with communication between threads.

I am also wondering how to access the server instance methods from inside the thread, as i am not sure. -note, this has been figured out, i am using a shared "lock" object, which has a list of the thread instances, and each thread instance has the lock instance, so they can call methods on eachother.

thanks very much.

import java.net.*;
import java.io.*;
import java.util.ArrayList;


public class server {

    private ArrayList<ClientServiceThread> SocketList;
    private int lock = 0;
    private ServerSocket myServerSocket;
    private Socket mySocket;

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        server myserver = new server();
    }

    public server()
    {

        /**
         * This will (when finished) accept only a certain number of connections,
         * and will then finish the constructor by breaking the while loop. It will
         * then sit here waiting for the synchronised methods to be called by its worker 
         * threads.
         */
        try{

            myServerSocket = new ServerSocket(8080);

        }catch(Exception e)
        {
            System.out.println("Could not create serversocket "+e);
        }

        int id = 1;
        while(true)
        {
            try{

                mySocket = myServerSocket.accept();
                ClientServiceThread cliThread = new ClientServiceThread(mySocket, id);
                SocketList.add(cliThread);
                id++;
                cliThread.start();

            }catch(Exception e)
            {
                System.out.println("Problem with accepting connections");
            }

        }

    }//end constructor


    public synchronized boolean acquireLock(int id)
    {
        /**
         * Here any spawned thread can try to acquire the lock, 
         * so it can be the one to send the data (synchronised to prevent data corruption) 
         */

        if(this.lock == 0){
            this.lock = id;
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            return false;
        }

    }

    public synchronized void releaseLock(int id)
    {
        /**
         * Any thread can call this, releasing the lock. of course, the lock will only be 
         * released if the thread calling it actually owns the lock.
         */

        if(id == this.lock)
        {
            this.lock = 0;
        }
        else
        {
            //do nothing
        }
    }

    public synchronized void publish(String toSend)
    {
        /**
         * When a thread in control of the lock wants to publish to all other threads, it
         * invokes this method, which then calls another synchronised method on each thread
         * in the list, telling it to write to it's client with the new data. 
         */

        for(int i = 0; i<this.SocketList.size(); i++)
        {
            if(i != this.lock)
            {
                this.SocketList.get(i).sendData(toSend);
            }
        }
    }


}



class ClientServiceThread extends Thread{

    Socket mySocket;
    int id;
    boolean hasControl = false;

    public ClientServiceThread(Socket mySocket, int id)
    {
        /**
         * this constructor gives it the ID and the socket for communication, it will
         * then be run
         */
        this.mySocket = mySocket;
        this.id = id;

    }

    @Override
    public void run()
    {
        //listen, it will be either a request, or some data
        //based on whether the client is the one in control or not (hasControl)
        try{
            //create buffered reader

            if(!this.hasControl)
            {
                //it has control, so wait for the lines
            }
            else
            {
                //read in one line and then call acquire lock because we know
                //that it has sent a request for control
                // how do i access the original class for acquireLock();?


            }


        }catch(IOException e)
        {
            System.out.println("Problem reading from the socket");
        }

    }

    public synchronized void sendData(String toSend)
    {
        //create writer and send to my client, saying "true" or some other message
        //the client will recognise as the go-ahead to edit the data. 
    }


}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You're probably better off using something like MINA instead of rolling your own. Drop client commands into a concurrent queue and process them one at a time so you don't have to worry about synchronization.

Alternatively, consider using a RESTful interface instead of sockets (or for that matter, something other than an applet, like Ext JS).

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thanks for the response, i'm sure those implementations are more suited but i forgot to mention this is for a university project, which must involve swing and sockets unfortunately :( –  Conor Sloan Nov 5 '11 at 20:47
    
You'll want to add the "homework" tag to your post then... –  Scott A Nov 5 '11 at 20:49
    
Oh ok, i'm new to this, first ever question :p –  Conor Sloan Nov 5 '11 at 20:50
    
At any rate, my comment stands: commands should be generated by the clients and placed on a concurrent queue, which is then processed by a command thread. –  Scott A Nov 5 '11 at 20:50
    
Ah ok ill look into that, thanks :) –  Conor Sloan Nov 5 '11 at 20:53

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