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I have an application that uses "secure" cookies and want to test it's functionality without needing to set up a complicated SSL enabled development server. Is there any way to do this as simply as I can test non-encrypted requests using ./manage.py runserver?

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Can't you just specify runserver 443 to make the server run on port 443? –  Furbeenator Nov 5 '11 at 22:56
    
@Furbeenator: Unfortunately not - this will just make the server HTTP on 443, what I need is an actual SSL server running. –  Evan Grim Nov 6 '11 at 6:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 62 down vote accepted

It's not as simple as the built in development server, but it's not too hard to get something close using stunnel as an SSLifying middleman between your browser and the development server. Stunnel allows you to set up a lightweight server on your machine that accepts connections on a configured port, wraps them with SSL, and passes them along to some other server. We'll use this to open a stunnel port (8443) and pass along any traffic it receives to a Django runserver instance.

First you'll need stunnel which can be downloaded here or may be provided by your platform's package system (e.g.: apt-get install stunnel). I'll be using version 4 of stunnel (e.g.: /usr/bin/stunnel4 on Ubuntu), version 3 will also work, but has different configuration options.

First create a directory in your Django project to hold the necessary configuration files and SSLish stuff.

mkdir stunnel
cd stunnel

Next we'll need to create a local certificate and key to be used for the SSL communication. For this we turn to openssl.

Create the key:

openssl genrsa 1024 > stunnel.key

Create the certificate that uses this key (this will ask you a bunch of information that will be included in the certficate - just answer with whatever feels good to you):

openssl req -new -x509 -nodes -sha1 -days 365 -key stunnel.key > stunnel.cert

Now combine these into a single file that stunnel will use for its SSL communication:

cat stunnel.key stunnel.cert > stunnel.pem

Create a config file for stunnel called dev_https with the following contents:

pid=

cert = stunnel/stunnel.pem
sslVersion = SSLv3
foreground = yes
output = stunnel.log

[https]
accept=8443
connect=8001
TIMEOUTclose=1

This file tells stunnel what it needs to know. Specifically, you're telling it not to use a pid file, where the certificate file is, what version of SSL to use, that it should run in the foreground, where it should log its output, and that it should accept connection on port 8443 and shuttle them along to port 8001. The last parameter (TIMEOUTclose) tells it to automatically close the connection after 1 second has passed with no activity.

Now pop back up to your Django project directory (the one with manage.py in it):

cd ..

Here we'll create a script named runserver that will run stunnel and two django development servers (one for normal connections, and one for SSL connections):

stunnel4 stunnel/dev_https &
python manage.py runserver&
HTTPS=1 python manage.py runserver 8001

Let's break this down, line-by-line:

  • Line 1: Starts stunnel and point it to the configuration file we just created. This has stunnel listen on port 8443, wrap any connections it receives in SSL, and pass them along to port 8001
  • Line 2: Starts a normal Django runserver instance (on port 8000)
  • Line 3: Starts another Django runserver instance (on port 8001) and configures it to treat all incoming connections as if they were being performed using HTTPS.

Make the runscript file we just created executable with:

chmod a+x runserver

Now when you want to run your development server just execute ./runserver from your project directory. To try it out, just point your browser to http://localhost:8000 for normal HTTP traffic, and https://localhost:8443 for HTTPS traffic. Note that you're browser will almost definitely complain about the certificate used and require you to add an exception or otherwise explicitly instruct the browser to continue browsing. This is because you created your own certificate and it isn't trusted by the browser to be telling the truth about who it is. This is fine for development, but obviously won't cut it for production.

Unfortunately, on my machine this runserver script doesn't exit out nicely when I hit Ctrl-C. I have to manually kill the processes - anyone have a suggestion to fix that?

Thanks to Michael Gile's post and django-weave's wiki entry for the reference material.

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Thanks, worked like a charm! Been looking a bit to find the full steps (including certificate creation) that would work. –  Rod Nov 28 '11 at 3:20
    
At last valid tutorial I can use :) –  szaman May 15 '12 at 10:47
1  
I just stumbled upon this answer. Some remarks: you don't necessarily need to run a separate development instance on 8001, you might as well let it connect to port 8000. If you want stunnel to be killed automatically, add a function and an exit trap: kill_stunnel() { kill $stunnel_pid } trap kill_stunnel exit stunnel4 stunnel/dev https & stunnel_pid=$1 –  Friek Oct 1 '13 at 20:38
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The second instance is invoked with HTTPS=1 which means that request.is_secure() will report True. If you don't need that then you're right - you can just point stunnel at the single instance. –  Evan Grim Oct 1 '13 at 21:05
    
If you run into stunnel fips mode not supported .... add fips = no to the dev_https file to turn it off –  yeahdixon Sep 9 at 18:26

I would recommend using the django-sslserver package.

The current package on PyPI only supports up to Django version 1.5.5 but a patch has been committed via 5d4664c. With this fix the system runs well and is a pretty simple and straightforward solution for testing https connections.

UPDATE: Since I posted my answer the commit above has been merged into the master branch and a new release has been pushed to PyPI. So there shouldn't be any need to specify the 5d4664c commit for that specific fix.

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1  
This works perfectly for me, and the setup is superfast too. –  Markus Amalthea Magnuson Jan 27 at 10:21
2  
This looks promising - I may have to update the accepted answer on this one. Anyone else want to weigh in? –  Evan Grim Feb 2 at 21:30
1  
Just tried it right now, works like a charm on 1.7c1. While I am all for interesting answers, this one just gets it done. The stunnel solution is good should the django-sslserver package stop being updated. +1 for this answer. –  Plastefuchs Jul 8 at 8:18

Signup to https://ngrok.com/. You can use https to test. This might help people who just want to quickly test https.

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I'm going to have to try that! Thanks! –  Evan Grim Oct 1 '13 at 21:25

It can be done in one line with socat:

socat openssl-listen:8443,fork,reuseaddr,cert=server.pem,verify=0 tcp:localhost:8000

, where 8443 is a port to listen for incoming HTTPS connections, server.pem is a self-signed server certificate and localhost:8000 is a debug HTTP server launched as usual.

More details: http://www.dest-unreach.org/socat/doc/socat-openssltunnel.html

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For those looking for a foregrounded version of the stunnel option for debugging purposes:

stunnel.pem is a certificate generated as in Evan Grimm's top voted answer.

Listen on all local interfaces on port 443 and forward to port 80 on localhost

sudo stunnel -f -p stunnel.pem -P ~/stunnel.pid -r localhost:80 -d 443

sudo is only necessary for incoming ports (-d [host:]port) under 1024

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