Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a class somewhat like this:

public class Test {

    private final List<ISomeType> things = new LinkedList<ISomeType>();

    public <T extends ISomeType> Test(Class<T> clazz, int order) {
        for (int i = 0; i < order; i++) {
            try {
                this.things.add(clazz.newInstance());
            } catch (Exception e) { 
                // stackoverflowers use your imagination
            }
        }
    }
}

Where I expect and hope the Class clazz has an accessible no-argument constructor. Is there any way I can enforce presence of it at compile time?

share|improve this question
1  
The correct term is no-argument constructor. –  Steve Kuo Apr 29 '09 at 16:10
    
Don't know why, but that method does not look Java-ish. –  yihtserns Mar 14 '11 at 5:52
add comment

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is no way to enforce constructor requirements at compile time. At runtime you can check class.getConstructors() and ensure there is one that has no args (or just catch the exception like you are in the sample code).

Usually the no-arg constructor requirement is just listed in the Javadoc of the base class or interface.

share|improve this answer
add comment

There are some tools for code style validation that can be extended to check for this type of requirement. For eclipse (and others), PMD may help you. By looking at the tutorial I think you should be able to write an specific rule to check for constructors without any parameters.

share|improve this answer
add comment

What about this?

interface Provider<T> {
   T get();
}

public class Test {

    private final List<ISomeType> things = new LinkedList<ISomeType>();

    public <T extends ISomeType> Test(Provider<T> provider, int order) {
        for (int i = 0; i < order; i++) {
            try {
                this.things.add(provider.get());
            } catch (Exception e) { 
                // stackoverflowers use your imagination
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your best bet is to create a unit test that checks this for each class you care about, and then run the unit tests at build time. Alternately, you can create a test class -- not distributed with your code -- that does nothing but exercise the no-arg constructors of the classes you care about. Not a great option.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The link below shows how to solve a similar situation (checking whether the subclasses of a particular class all have no-argument constructor) using Java 6 and the Annotation Processing Tool:

Annotation Processing Tool

Maybe you can adapt their solution to solve your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Good link. That might very well be the answer. –  Michael Myers Apr 29 '09 at 17:36
add comment

Reflection is about doing things at runtime instead of compile time. Don't use reflection if you want your code to work.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 Your code will work, also with Reflection, as long as you really understand what you are doing. But you're right, one should not use Reflection without need, as you lose compile time safety. –  Ridcully Sep 3 '10 at 9:54
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.