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I found that this works sporadically, but usually doesn't work at all.

$(window).unload(function()
{
    $.ajax
    ({
        url: "script.php",
        type: "POST",
        data: 
        { 
            value: value
        }
    });
});

Setting the async to false (i.e.'async' : false) does get around the problem and executes the php script every time. But depending on the script, it can freeze the browser up for a while.

Is there a good way of sending data to a php script and having the server execute it without the user waiting for a response?

EDIT - My understanding of client-server interaction is rusty, but it's not the request sending that's taking a long time, it's the processing of the data sent by the request. I'm wondering if that processing can occur without the user having to be on the page at all.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You would need to accomplish this on the server side by closing the connection and then continuing to process the data. In php it would look something like this:

<?php
  header("Content-Length: 0");
  header("Connection: close");
  flush();

 //At this point the request is finished and you can continue to process the data. 
 //Keep in mind the connection is now closed and you can no longer return any information to the user.

?>

Note this isn't technically firing a background task so you should be fine doing this on a shared host. Just as long as it doesn't hang for an exceptionally long period of time.

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Thanks for the answer. It didn't solve the problem though. The data is still not being saved. I noticed also that it's sporadically saved with links within the domain, but when a user closes the window, it never saves. –  Mirov Nov 6 '11 at 7:18
    
Do you still have async set to false? Because if not you might be terminating the request before all the data gets sent. –  Jason Teplitz Nov 6 '11 at 16:50
    
This should be stressed more, that the async needs to be set to false in order for it to work. Asynchronous request will be cancelled by the browser default behavior and thus it might, or might not work. For example - if server returns response before browser finishes refreshing / closing, it can work, but most of the time a cancel on request will be called. Then it all depends upon the browser behavior in such situation - in my tests, requests done with FF for example tended to be counted, whereas those done with Chrome were not. –  eithedog May 14 '12 at 12:10

I wouldn't imagine so. The browser is being shut down thus it's trying to close all connections. I don't see how it would send a request without getting the user to wait. You're pretty much asking it to work in the background.

I would stick to async: false but perhaps notify the user with a Please wait... message or similar. Test in your target browsers too because it seems like a bit of a nuisance, not being able to close the browser/tab and waiting for an ajax call to finish.

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My understanding of client-server interaction is rusty, but it's not the request sending that's taking a long time, it's the processing of the data sent by the request. I'm wondering if that processing can occur without the user having to be on the page at all –  Mirov Nov 5 '11 at 21:17
    
@user745434 I would fire off a request that starts a background task on your server. This means the server would keep doing its job after the response has been sent back to the browser. –  Marko Nov 5 '11 at 21:24
    
I'll look into this. It's a shared host, so I don't know if it's possible though. Thanks Marko –  Mirov Nov 5 '11 at 21:28
    
@user745434 No worries, I'm not too familiar with PHP so I can't help on that topic, it may be worth starting a new question though (i.e. How to run a background task on a shared host?) if you can't find what you're after. –  Marko Nov 5 '11 at 21:36

I have not tried, but maybe you can add a timeout (with a small value), or abort the request just after send it (with .abort() method).

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