Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

In this question I got help to write a PHP function which gives a pyramid-like distribution:

function getRandomStrength($min, $max) {
    $ln_low = log($min, M_E);
    $ln_high = log($max, M_E);
    $scale = $ln_high-$ln_low;
    $rand = (mt_rand()/mt_getrandmax())*$scale+$ln_low;
    $value = round(pow(M_E, $rand), 1);
    return $value;
}
getRandomStrenth(1.1, 9.9);
// output could be: 1.4 or 8.3 or 9.8 or 7.2 or 2.9 or ...

When I run 50,000 iterations and check how often the numbers from 1 to 9 appear, I get the following list:

  • 1 » 26%
  • 2 » 19%
  • 3 » 14%
  • 4 » 10%
  • 5 » 9%
  • 6 » 7%
  • 7 » 6%
  • 8 » 6%
  • 9 » 4%

This is what I wanted to have. But now I would like to adjust this function a bit. The smaller values should appear more often and the big values should appear less often - so that I get a list like this:

  • 1 » 28%
  • 2 » 20%
  • 3 » 15%
  • 4 » 11%
  • 5 » 9%
  • 6 » 6%
  • 7 » 5%
  • 8 » 5%
  • 9 » 2%

As you can see, I just need a slight modification. But what can I change so that my function behaves as expected?

I tried several things (e.g. changing the base of the logarithm) but this did not change anything.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

You can use pow on the random number.

$rand = pow( mt_rand()/mt_getrandmax(), 1.2 )*$scale+$ln_low;

By playing with the exponent value, you can get less or more small value.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that the resulting values must be in the given range (between the paramters $min and $max). Can't one just use another function, different from ln()? –  Marco W. Nov 8 '11 at 14:02
1  
as mt_rand()/mt_getrandmax() is between 0 and 1, pow(mt_rand()/mt_getrandmax(), x) with any x will be between 0 and 1. So the $rand will have exactly the same range, but with different distribution –  crazyjul Nov 8 '11 at 14:08
    
Oh yes, you're right, of course :D Such a short answer but sooo good! This is exactly what I need. But one thing is striking: If I calculate the relative frequencies of all values from 1.1 to 9.9, I can see that 1.1 is less frequent than 1.2. Why is this so? 1.1 should be more frequent as it is smaller, right? This is not a random thing which changes from trial to trial. And it's a big difference. I got these values: 1.1»6.14%, 1.2»7.1%, 1.3»5.08% –  Marco W. Nov 8 '11 at 17:48
1  
The reason is simple, you are using round to create your value. But round is not correctly distributed. Let's take a simple example : if I take a random number between 0 and 2, round will create value like this : 0->0.49999 = 0, 0.5->1.49999 = 1, 1.5->2 = 2. The distribution is then 25% for 0, 50% for 1, 25% for 2. Your code suffers from this problem –  crazyjul Nov 8 '11 at 19:54
    
Of course, this is the reason. Should have been obvious to me! Thank you very much for the explanation, the excellent comments and the easy but great answer. –  Marco W. Nov 8 '11 at 21:29

Reducing the $scale of your function by a small (constant) amount seems to generate results pretty close to what you're looking for. You can achieve more accurate results by making this reduction of $scale a function of the randomly generated number from mt_rand(), which would require saving (mt_rand()/mt_getrandmax()) to a variable and performing some additional math on $scale.

Here are my tests, you can run it yourself: http://codepad.viper-7.com/ssblbQ

function getRandomStrength($min, $max) 
{
    $ln_low = log($min, M_E);
    $ln_high = log($max, M_E);
    $scale = $ln_high-$ln_low - .05; // Subtract a small constant, vary between .05 and .08
    $rand = (mt_rand()/mt_getrandmax())*$scale+$ln_low;
    $value = round(pow(M_E, $rand), 1);
    return $value;
}

$values = array_fill(1, 9, 0);
for( $i = 0; $i < 50000; $i++) 
{
    $values[ intval( getRandomStrength(1.1, 9.9)) ]++;
}

for( $i = 1; $i <= 9; $i++) 
{
    $values[ $i] /= 500; // / 50000 * 100 to get a percent
}

var_dump( $values);

Output

Run #1 - Constant = 0.5

array(9) {
  [1] => float(26.626) // Should be 28
  [2] => float(19.464) // Should be 20
  [3] => float(13.476) // Should be 15
  [4] => float(10.41) // Should be 11
  [5] => float(8.616) // Should be 9
  [6] => float(7.198) // Should be 6
  [7] => float(6.258) // Should be 5
  [8] => float(5.52) // Should be 5
  [9] => float(2.432) // Should be 2
}

Run #2 - Constant = 0.65

array(9) {
  [1] => float(26.75) // Should be 28
  [2] => float(19.466) // Should be 20
  [3] => float(13.872) // Should be 15
  [4] => float(10.562) // Should be 11
  [5] => float(8.466) // Should be 9
  [6] => float(7.222) // Should be 6
  [7] => float(6.454) // Should be 5
  [8] => float(5.554) // Should be 5
  [9] => float(1.654) // Should be 2
}

Run #3 - Constant = 0.70

array(9) {
  [1] => float(26.848) // Should be 28
  [2] => float(19.476) // Should be 20
  [3] => float(13.808) // Should be 15
  [4] => float(10.764) // Should be 11
  [5] => float(8.67) // Should be 9
  [6] => float(7.148) // Should be 6
  [7] => float(6.264) // Should be 5
  [8] => float(5.576) // Should be 5
  [9] => float(1.446) // Should be 2
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for the detailed survey and testing! The only problem is that I need values which are inside the range between $min and $max (the parameters). And if I understand your modification correctly, values such as 9.9 wouldn't be possible anymore, would they? –  Marco W. Nov 8 '11 at 14:03
    
Yes, you're correct, the maximum value is around 9.3 My mistake, I was not aware of this restriction. –  nickb Nov 8 '11 at 18:00
    
I should have made it clearer, of course. Anyway, thank you very much for this effort! –  Marco W. Nov 8 '11 at 21:28

For n in {0..1}, y=(x^n)-1, y will range from 0 to x-1. That curve is then easily mapped from 0 to some max value by multiplying by the range and dividing by (x-1). If you change the value x to something near one, the curve will be nearly linear, and at large values, the curve becomes more like a hockey-stick, but will still fall in the same range.

My initial sample value of three won't be precisely what you expressed, but you can adjust it to get the distribution curve you're looking for.

function getCustomStrength($min, $max, $x_val, $base) {
  $logmax = $base-1;
  $range = $max-$min;
  return (pow($base,$x_val)-1)*($range/($base-1))+$min;
}

function getRandomStrength($min, $max) {
  $rand = mt_rand()/mt_getrandmax();
  $base = 3.0;
  return getCustomStrength($min, $max, $rand, $base);
}

getRandomStrength(1.1, 9.9);

share|improve this answer
    
Just a note for whatever formula you end up with... if you provide an evenly distributed list of values to represent your random number, you can visualize the distribution of scores in a line/bar chart. –  phatfingers Nov 8 '11 at 21:32
    
Thank you very much for this answer, phatfingers :) After some testing, I found out that your function gives exactly the same distribution as my function with crazyjul's modification. So both are similar and it doesn't matter which one I use. But could you explain your last comment again, please?! I didn't understand what you mean, sorry. I didn't understand what I have to do (so the "if ... random number"). –  Marco W. Nov 8 '11 at 22:28
    
Prior to coding, I mocked up a spreadsheet to get a better understanding of the problem. I used something similar to the pseudocode: for ($i=0; $i<100; $i+=(1/99)) { print getCustomStrength(1.1, 9.9, $i, 9) . "\n"; }. Paste into the spreadsheet, and chart it. You'll see a smooth curve, and in the data you can easily see the distribution by counting how many values start with 1, how many start with 2, etc. Using random values will give you the same distribution, but this gives a cleaner visualization to better see how to tweak your curve. –  phatfingers Nov 8 '11 at 23:12
    
Ah yes, now I understand :) Thank you very much, this is a good idea! And thanks again for the good code. –  Marco W. Nov 9 '11 at 14:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.