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class Printer;
enum Printer::States;
class Printer {                  // choose one of monitor or cormonitor
    States taskStates[];
  public:
    enum States { Starting = 'S', Blocked = 'B', Unblocked = 'U', Finished = 'F', // general
          Napping = 'N', Awake = 'A',             // Santa
          Working = 'W', NeedHelp = 'H',          // elf
          OnVacation = 'V', CheckingIn = 'I',     // reindeer
          DeliveringToys = 'D', DoneDelivering = 'd', // Santa, reindeer
          Consulting = 'C', DoneConsulting = 'c' // Santa, elves
    };
    Printer();
    void print( unsigned int id, States state );
    void print( unsigned int id, States state, unsigned int numBlocked );
};
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Nate, Tim Cooper, Beta, Sam Miller, Graviton Nov 6 '11 at 9:11

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Is there an actual question? – K-ballo Nov 5 '11 at 22:10
1  
Or you could just make a private section after the enum is declared and put it in that... – Seth Carnegie Nov 5 '11 at 22:15
    
Are you asking how/where to define States? – Beta Nov 5 '11 at 22:17
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can't declare nested enums outside of the class. You also have to have it be defined before you use it.

class Printer {                  // choose one of monitor or cormonitor
  public:
    enum States { Starting = 'S', Blocked = 'B', Unblocked = 'U', Finished = 'F', // general
      Napping = 'N', Awake = 'A',             // Santa
      Working = 'W', NeedHelp = 'H',          // elf
      OnVacation = 'V', CheckingIn = 'I',     // reindeer
      DeliveringToys = 'D', DoneDelivering = 'd', // Santa, reindeer
      Consulting = 'C', DoneConsulting = 'c' // Santa, elves
    };
  private:
    States taskStates[];
  public:
    Printer();
    void print( unsigned int id, States state );
    void print( unsigned int id, States state, unsigned int numBlocked );
};

As a side-note, C++11's enum class only has to be declared inside the class - it can be defined outside of it.

share|improve this answer

It looks like you are trying to forward-declare an enumeration. In C++03 this is illegal. In C++11, you can do this as long as you specify the underlying type of the enum. From wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%2B%2B11#Strongly_typed_enumerations

enum Enum1;                      // Illegal in C++03 and C++11; the underlying type cannot be determined.
enum Enum2 : unsigned int;       // Legal in C++11, the underlying type is explicitly specified.
enum class Enum3;                // Legal in C++11, the underlying type is int.
enum class Enum4 : unsigned int; // Legal C++11.
enum Enum2 : unsigned short;     // Illegal in C++11, because Enum2 was previously declared with a different underlying type.

So if your compiler supports forward-declared enums, you can turn on C++0x/C++11 support change your code to:

class Printer;
enum Printer::States : char;
class Printer {                  // choose one of monitor or cormonitor
    States taskStates[];
  public:
    enum States : char { Starting = 'S', Blocked = 'B', Unblocked = 'U', Finished = 'F', // general
          Napping = 'N', Awake = 'A',             // Santa
          Working = 'W', NeedHelp = 'H',          // elf
          OnVacation = 'V', CheckingIn = 'I',     // reindeer
          DeliveringToys = 'D', DoneDelivering = 'd', // Santa, reindeer
          Consulting = 'C', DoneConsulting = 'c' // Santa, elves
    };
    Printer();
    void print( unsigned int id, States state );
    void print( unsigned int id, States state, unsigned int numBlocked );
};

If not, you can't scope your enum to the class. You could make a separate namespace and use a typedef to get similar syntax:

class Printer;

namespace printer {
    enum States : char { Starting = 'S', Blocked = 'B', Unblocked = 'U', Finished = 'F', // general
          Napping = 'N', Awake = 'A',             // Santa
          Working = 'W', NeedHelp = 'H',          // elf
          OnVacation = 'V', CheckingIn = 'I',     // reindeer
          DeliveringToys = 'D', DoneDelivering = 'd', // Santa, reindeer
          Consulting = 'C', DoneConsulting = 'c' // Santa, elves
    };
}

class Printer {                  // choose one of monitor or cormonitor
    States taskStates[];
  public:
    typedef printer::States States;

    Printer();
    void print( unsigned int id, States state );
    void print( unsigned int id, States state, unsigned int numBlocked );
};

And then outside of the Printer class, before the Printer class definiton has been seen, you'll need to refer to States as printer::States rather than Printer::states. After the Printer class definition has been seen, you can refer to States as Printer::States as usual (because of the typedef).

Alternatively, if you drop the namespace you just refer to them as States.

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