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At work we have a bunch of sites hosted on our development server. The folder containing all these sites is mapped as a network drive.

In VisualStudio I open the root of the site as a WebSite and when I build the site I alwys get this error.

Error 4 An error occurred loading a configuration file: Failed to start monitoring changes to 'I:\Sitename\wwwroot\' because the network BIOS command limit has been reached. For more information on this error, please refer to Microsoft knowledge base article 810886. Hosting on a UNC share is not supported for the Windows XP Platform. I:\Sitename\wwwroot\web.config

I've checked out the KB article and made the registry changes it suggests but this didn't help.

Does anyone know of a fix or workaround for this?

Thanks

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3 Answers

Instead of using a mapped drive, use full UNC path and give your current logged in user access to that path: \\MachineName\Sitename\wwwroot\web.config

Chances are high you will get a different effect from that , especially if the Mapped drive was being mapped with different credentials.

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Take a look at this hotfix: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/911272

It cures the problem

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Changing the FCNMode using that hotfix doesn't always fix the problem.

I made a very detailed answer to this problem here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/20710473/705198

That answer is an accumulation of all the technet, msdn, and blog reference material I could find on the subject, and what we ended up having to do to fix the problem. Disabling Jumbo Frames (HP Server NIC problems causing another error) and SMB2+ combined with the registry edits were what ended up saving us with our high traffic IIS sites. The registry edits alone only made it so the network bios limit errors would not show up as fast under normal load.

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