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Take this code, for example:

/*
 * foo.h
 *
 *  Created on: Nov 5, 2011
 *      Author: AutoBotAM
 */

#ifndef FOO_H_
#define FOO_H_

template<typename Type>
class Foo
{
public:
    void Bar(Type object);
};


#endif /* FOO_H_ */

.

/*
 * foo.cpp
 *
 *  Created on: Nov 5, 2011
 *      Author: AutoBotAM
 */

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

#include "foo.h"

template<typename Type>
void Foo<Type>::Bar(Type object)
{
    cout << object;
}

.

/*
 * main.cpp
 *
 *  Created on: Oct 15, 2011
 *      Author: AutoBotAM
 */

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

#include "foo.h"

Foo<int> foo;

int main()
{
    cout << "The year is ";
    foo.Bar(2011);
    return 0;
}

This is how I usually go about declaring non-template classes. Unfortunately this code results in the error ../src/main.cpp:18: undefined reference to 'Foo<int>::Bar(int)' (in MinGW). I did some reading, and it turns out you have to declare template classes in the same translation unit, like so:

/*
 * foo.h
 *
 *  Created on: Nov 5, 2011
 *      Author: AutoBotAM
 */

#ifndef FOO_H_
#define FOO_H_

template<typename Type>
class Foo
{
public:
    void Bar(Type object)
    {
        cout << object;
    }
};


#endif /* FOO_H_ */

My big question is, why do you have to do this? I could imagine a few pitfalls in development with this scheme. For example, imagine we had 50 translation units #including foo.h, and we make a change to void Foo::Bar(Type). Since Bar is in the header file, we'll have to wait for all 50 of those translation units to compile before we get any results. If we had Bar working in foo.cpp separately, we would only have to wait for 1 translation unit to compile. Are there any ways to overcome this issue?

Thanks for any advice!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Templates are not types. They are only templates. They only become a type when they are instantiated (with a complete set of parameters).

Compilation requires that all necessary type definitions be available at compile time. Moreover, linking requires that all necessary function definitions, including member functions, exist in some translation unit (with inlining providing the usual exemption to the one-definition-rule).

If you put all this together, it follows almost automatically that all template member function definition of a template class must be available for every used template instantiation at some point in the compilation process.

On the other hand, consider the following setup:

// Header file:
template <typename T> struct Foo { void f(); }

// "Implementation" file
template <typename T> void Foo::f() { /* stuff */ }

If you compile the implementation file, it doesn't contain any code, since there is no template instance to be compiled. A user of the header file may instantiate Foo<int>, but the body of the class never gets instantiated in any TU, so you get a linker error when piecing together the program.

It may help to think of templates as a code generation tool rather than actual code, at least for the purpose of compilation.

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Templates lay somewhere between compile and link time. An eager implementation can do much after seeing a template declaration, but actual code cannot be generated until the template is instantiated with its template arguments.

You can have template class functions in a cpp file, and you can explicitly instantiate it with those arguments that you will be using it. However, you can only use those instantiations in your entire program. For instance, you can add to foo.cpp

template class Foo<int>;

now you can use Foo<int>s anywhere even while the implementations are in a translation unit of its own. However you cannot use any other kind of Foo<> since the linker won't be able to find its functions (they don't actually exist).

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"You can have template class functions in a cpp file, and you can explicitly instantiate it with those arguments that you will be using it." What is the syntax for this? (Edit, never mind, thanks) –  AutoBotAM Nov 5 '11 at 23:19

Templates are meta programming. They don't get compiled (directly) into object code. Just the results of them.

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Never knew this. Although I'd still like to know why they have to be declared in the same translation unit. –  AutoBotAM Nov 5 '11 at 23:15
    
Same reason you can't declare half a class in one file and the other half of the class in another. Think of the template as declaring only and the compiler is writing your implementation. –  Joe McGrath Nov 5 '11 at 23:19
1  
might sound cheesy but you can think of templates as 'macros on steroids'. Unlike macros they're deeply integrated into the core language. But like macros templates don't actually emit code until instantiated by the compiler. –  seand Nov 5 '11 at 23:30
    
@seand Agree. I haven't used them much, but always thought of them as #define with type checking. –  Joe McGrath Nov 5 '11 at 23:36
    
@Joe I think templates are really powerful -- as long as they aren't abused and overused. I can't understand C++ code where every other line is a template :( –  seand Nov 5 '11 at 23:44

Most compilers do not support external templates yet, which would allow the type of cpp/h separate you are looking for. However, you can still separate template declarations from implementations similar to what you want. Put the declarations in a .h files, put the implementations in a separate source file with whatever extension you want (.i and .ipp are popular), and then #include the source file at the bottom of the .h file. The compiler sees a single translation unit, and you get code separation.

/*
* foo.h
*
* Created on: Nov 5, 2011
* Author: AutoBotAM
*/
#ifndef FOO_H_
#define FOO_H_

template<typename Type>
class Foo
{
public:
    void Bar(Type object);
};

#include "foo.ipp"

#endif /* FOO_H_ */

.

/*
* foo.ipp
*
* Created on: Nov 5, 2011
* Author: AutoBotAM
*/

#include <iostream>

template<typename Type>
void Foo<Type>::Bar(Type object)
{
    std::cout << object;
}
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