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In terms of best/most common practices for programming, where should code go that prevents certain functions from being called, while keeping performance in mind?

for example, if I have a function that can break if called at the wrong time, which of these approaches is most common?

A:

Data *someData = new Data;

while(running)
{
    ProcessData(someData);
};

void ProcessData(Data *data)
{
    if(data)
        data->member = 5;
}

B:

Data *someData = new Data;

while(running)
{
    if(someData)
        ProcessData(someData);
};

void ProcessData(Data *data)
{
    data->member = 5;
}

edit: to clarify, I am asking whether functions should do their own validation, or rely on the client code not to call the function while in the wrong state.

In the case where a function could be 5 calls deep, adding validation to each function could add quite a bit of extra bulk to the code, and potentially hurt performance, but more importantly reduce the readability of the code.

so I am asking what the average developer would expect in this situation

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Are you asking if ProcessData() should assume 'data' is valid before it's called, or should ProcessData() silently ignore if invalid? –  seand Nov 5 '11 at 23:41
1  
Maybe Assertions could be helpful if the bad input would be a result of improper coding. Than they would be removed from release code. –  Joe McGrath Nov 6 '11 at 1:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Validating method calls for valid parameters has a performance cost but there's also a 'cost' when errors occur. For example kernel functions can't allow things to crash internally -- it can bring down the entire system.

Generally what I do is look how tightly coupled the caller and callee are. If they are both under your direct control than the callee can probably trust it's not invoked with crap. But if you have have less control then it may need more validation.

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For that specific case, the most common method is probably

void ProcessData(Data& data) {
  data.member = 5;
}

Or

void Data::Process() {
    member = 5;
}

Neither of those can be called without a valid Data object to act upon, so there is no need for extraneous testing. Also, documentation is your friend: if a function can only be called after initializing the main event loop, then make sure the function's docs say "Only call this function after initializing your main event loop."

More than that depends on your specific situation.

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You mean when to do input validation? Well, outside your >= O(n) loop if you can the check in O(1) time and n is potentially very large.

But if the choice, as in your example, is between doing the check once inside a publicly advertised function or once in its client code, by all means do it in the function. Otherwise, this would be a case of premature optimization which is the Root of All Evil (TM).

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And of course, everyone who calls the function needs to know that it cannot operate on certain objects. If you check inside the function you hide this implementation detail to the outside world. –  hochl Nov 5 '11 at 23:38

Well, in general, it's kinda better, a bit, if you decide whether or not to call a long function chain as high up as possible in order to avoid unnecessary calls/returns. That said, I don't really understand your question or example that well...

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