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I have two strings. String A: "The quick brown fox" String B: "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog."

String B will always contain string A verbatim. There will never be a "quick black fox" or a "quick and speedy brown fox".

How do a get a "String C" of the difference "jumps over the lazy dog."?

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1  
Homework? Anyways, a simple way is to start with a length variable (call it l or something) and run a loop that sees if strA.substring(0,l) == strB.substring(0,l) untill it doesnt. Then, return strB.substring(l);. –  Alxandr Nov 5 '11 at 23:32
    
Please post what you have tried so far. –  Michael Berkowski Nov 5 '11 at 23:37
7  
differenceString = string2.replace(string1,""); o_o? –  Joseph Marikle Nov 5 '11 at 23:44
    
My answer works. It writes all the differences in the string. Look below –  comu Nov 5 '11 at 23:47

4 Answers 4

comu's answer as a function...

function compareString( s1, s2, splitChar ){
    if ( typeof splitChar == "undefined" ){
        splitChar = " ";
    }
    var string1 = new Array();
    var string2 = new Array();

    string1 = s1.split( splitChar );
    string2 = s2.split( splitChar );
    var diff = new Array();

    if(s1.length>s2.length){
        var long = string1;
    }
    else {
        var long = string2;
    }
    for(x=0;x<long.length;x++){
        if(string1[x]!=string2[x]){
            diff.push(string2[x]);
        }
    }

    return diff;    
}
compareString( "?Yo=dude", "?Yo=Dude&do=roby", "&" ).join('\n');
compareString( "?Yo=Dude", "?Yo=Dude&do=roby", "&" ).join('\n');

Note: this answer solves the issue of finding extra query parameters (based on another query string), and is not an exact answer for the OP.

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That's quite an overengineered solution!! ~Ghost-Man's solution is at least an order of magnitude more efficient! stackoverflow.com/a/8024608/1450294 –  Michael Scheper Aug 19 at 15:10
1  
That's a fair comment @Michael I haven't answered the original question, but posted a solution to the problem that I had at the time. I think I must have done this as this was the problem I was trying to solve and it was comu's answer that helped me, so I posted the code I used. I'll update my answer to reflect that it doesn't answer the question exactly. –  chim Aug 20 at 8:34
1  
Ghost man's answer ought to be the accepted answer. –  chim Aug 20 at 8:35
    
I commend your StackOverflow integrity. :-) –  Michael Scheper Aug 20 at 14:57

Just do below:

<script type="text/javascript>
 string_a= "The quick";
 string_b= "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog."
 first_occurance=string_b.indexOf(string_a);
 if(first_occurance==-1)
 {
  alert('Search string Not found');   
 }else
 {
   string_a_length=string_a.length;
   if(first_occurance==0)
   {
    new_string=string_b.substring(string_a_length);
   }else
   {
    new_string=string_b.substring(0,first_occurance);
    new_string+=string_b.substring(first_occurance+string_a_length);  
   }
    alert(new_string);
 }
</script>

You can check out the running code fiddle here

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I used to be a computer science tutor (or, in the US, a 'TA'). This would be the only answer I'd award full marks to. It ought to be the accepted answer. –  Michael Scheper Aug 19 at 15:14

You need to cross check each word to the other one.

var s1 = "The quick brown fox";
var s2 = "The quick brown fox jumped over the fence";
var string1 = new Array();
var string2 = new Array();
string1 = s1.split(" ");
string2 = s2.split(" ");
var diff = new Array();

if(s1.length>s2.length){
    var long = string1;
}
else {
    var long = string2;
}
for(x=0;x<long.length;x++){
   if(string1[x]!=string2[x]){
      diff.push(string2[x]);
   }
}

document.write("The difference in the strings is " + diff.join(" "));
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2  
"string B will always contain string A verbatim" means "don't check word by word" –  Triptych Nov 6 '11 at 0:00
    
Will it always be an extension, or could string A be anywhere in string B. –  comu Nov 6 '11 at 1:13
    
You misinterpreted the question. In your answer s1 and s2 would be wrong because s2 doesn't contain s1. –  Andy Ray Nov 6 '11 at 1:39
    
Ok. Than make it like your example. It still works –  comu Nov 6 '11 at 2:32
    
It may work, but again, it's grossly inefficient and unnecessarily complicated. –  Michael Scheper Aug 19 at 15:13

Check out this site for a wonderful API to see the difference between strings: google-diff-match-patch You might need to check the UI according to your need though.

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