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I am trying to write a simple MIPS program manually to illustrate the stack frame.

The full assembly code is here: http://pastebin.com/EGRikr5K

I want to illustrate stack creation when we enter MAIN and when we call MYADD in main, since main is called by another C++ library function.

Do you guys think this is correct?

main:   
        subu    $sp, $sp, 32    # 
        sw      $ra, 28($sp)    # save return address
        sw      $fp, 24($sp)    # save previous frame pointer (ebp)
        sw      $s0, 20($sp)    # preserve $s0
        sw      $s1, 16($sp)    # preserve $s1

...
#Before calling
    add     $a0, $0, $s0    # varA is an argv
    jal     MYADD           # jump & link

MYADD:      
        subu    $sp, $sp, 32    # 
        sw      $ra, 28($sp)    # save return address
        sw      $fp, 24($sp)    # save previous frame pointer (ebp)
        sw      $s0, 20($sp)    # preserve $s0, varA = 42
        sw      $s1, 16($sp)    # preserve $s1, sum = 31

Suppose I have the following C++ code:

int main()
{
    int a = 42;
    int sum = 31;
    sum = myadd(a);
    return 0;
}

int myadd(int x)
{
    int t = 1;
    x = x + t;
    return x;
}

I know the basic setup of stack creation:

Caller

  • push all the arguments to register $a0 - $a3, and if there are more arguments they will pushed on the stack
  • jump using jal (which will link and jump in two clock cycles)

Callee

At the beginning of callee, I think this happens:

  • Establish stack frame by subtracting $sp - [frame size].
  • Save registers $s0 - $s7 (whichever one is to be used), $fp, and $ra.
  • Set frame pointer by adding the stack frame size to $sp. Hence, $fp will point to the first word of the current stack frame.

Thank you very much.

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1  
I think it's correct. Just keep in mind you have $t0-$t7 to use freely inside functions. If you can use $t0-$t7 no need to save $s0-$s7 registers if you do not touch them. –  m0skit0 Nov 7 '11 at 7:49
    
Thank you very much. –  CppLearner Nov 7 '11 at 8:19

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