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I'm creating a class where one of the methods inserts a new item into the sorted list. The item is inserted in the corrected (sorted) position in the sorted list. I'm not allowed to use any built-in list functions or methods other than [], [:], +, and len though. This is the part that's really confusing to me.

What would be the best way in going about this?

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4  
Homework? You would probably start by searching the Web how to insert elements into a sorted list. –  Felix Kling Nov 6 '11 at 1:16
1  
if only there was a well known sorting algorithm that was suited to INSERTION =P –  jon_darkstar Nov 6 '11 at 1:25
    
I'm not allowed to use and built-in list functions though –  Will S Nov 6 '11 at 16:36

6 Answers 6

Hint 1: You might want to study the Python code in the bisect module.

Hint 2: Slicing can be used for list insertion:

>>> s = ['a', 'b', 'd', 'e']
>>> s[2:2] = ['c']
>>> s
['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e']
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+1 for at least mentioning The Right Way to do this outside of a classroom setting. –  Triptych Nov 6 '11 at 1:49
3  
+1 for slicing trick. Python is so magic, there is always something to learn:) –  pajton Nov 6 '11 at 13:32
1  
+1 for leading a horse to water. I'm curious, is there a reason to prefer slicing over insort()? –  kkurian Feb 3 '12 at 20:11

Usually it's great to give us what you've got already. This hint might help clear up your difficulties, but if you give us a code snippet (or even pseudocode) we might be better able to help you figure out how to get past your point of confusion:

>>> x = range(0,5)
>>> y = range(5,10)
>>> x
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> y
[5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
>>> x+y
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
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You should use the bisect module. Also, the list needs to be sorted before using bisect.insort_left

It's a pretty big difference.

>>> l = [0, 2, 4, 5, 9]
>>> bisect.insort_left(l,8)
>>> l
[0, 2, 4, 5, 8, 9]

timeit.timeit("l.append(8); l = sorted(l)",setup="l = [4,2,0,9,5]; import bisect; l = sorted(l)",number=10000)
    1.2235019207000732

timeit.timeit("bisect.insort_left(l,8)",setup="l = [4,2,0,9,5]; import bisect; l=sorted(l)",number=10000)
    0.041441917419433594
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This is a possible solution for you:

a = [15, 12, 10]
b = sorted(a)
print b # --> b = [10, 12, 15]
c = 13
for i in range(len(b)):
    if b[i] > c:
        index = i
        break
d = b[:i] + [c] + b[i:]
print d # --> d = [10, 12, 13, 15]
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Not the best solution, the bisect module would find the insertion point in O(log n) steps, your's potentially has to search the whole list, O(n) complexity. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 20 '12 at 15:25

Use the insort function of the bisect module:

>> import bisect 
>> a = [1, 2, 4, 5] 
>> bisect.insort(a, 3) 
>> print(a) 
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5] 
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This thread is 2 years old and specifies that no stdlib modules may be used. -1 –  roippi Aug 1 '13 at 18:00

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