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I am trying to write a category and override fontWithName:size in UIFont. I am doing this for unit testing to avoid crashes caused by font names that are available on ipad and not on OSX. So I need to return a simple font that exists on both platform doesn't matter what the nib or code requests.

I tried the following but I run into an infinite loop, any idea on how I can achieve this?

+ (UIFont *)fontWithName:(NSString *)fontName size:(CGFloat)fontSize
{
    return [UIFont fontWithName:@"Arial" size:fontSize];
}

Edit:

I also tried returning a CTFont but my test target does not recognize CTFont? Any idea what header I should import to use CTFont?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+ (UIFont *)fontWithName:(NSString *)fontName size:(CGFloat)fontSize
{
    return [[[NSFont alloc] init] autorelease];
}

The above solution is an answer to my question. But for fixing the unit testing problem I ended up running them as application tests instead of logic tests, that way they run in the iOS environment and they don't crash. The change was to set my Bundle Loader to point to my application target, and set the Test Host to post to my Bundle Loader.

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By creating a category that has a method with the same you have replaced the original method. Therefore the following call is a recursive one: [UIFont fontWithName:@"Arial" size:fontSize];

I would create a new method with a different name (especially as the fontName parameter of your new method is unused), and switch all existing calls to use that.

See the accepted answer to this question for further discussion: Using Super in an Objective C Category?

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that doesn't solve my problem. I have no control over the method the nibs call when trying to initialize the fonts. –  aryaxt Nov 6 '11 at 17:32
    
Check out the link I posted. It talks about the pros and cons of method swizzling. Using method swizzling you can replace a method and call the original one –  jjwchoy Nov 6 '11 at 18:58

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