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As explained, for example, here, we all know of 3 main uses for the void keyword (more experienced C/C++ programmers can skip to the 4th use):

1) As a return type for function that doesn't return anything. This will cause a code sample like this:

void foo();
int i = foo();

to generate a compiler error.

2) As the only parameter in a function's parameter list. AFAIK, an empty function's parameter list is exactly the same to the compiler and therefore the following 2 lines are identical in meaning: (edit: it is only true in c++. The comments show the difference in c).

int foo();
int foo(void);

3) void* is a special type of generic pointer- it can point to any variable that is not declared with the const or volatile keyword, convert to/from any type of data pointer, and point to all non-member functions. In addition, it cannot be dereferenced. I will not give examples.

There is also a 4th use that I don't fully understand:

4) In conditional compilation it is often used in the expression (void)0 as following:

// procedure that actually prints error message 
void _assert(char* file, int line, char* test); 
#ifdef NDEBUG 
#define assert(e) ((void)0) 
#else
#define assert(e)     \
((e) ? (void)0 :   \
__assert(__FILE__, __LINE__, #e)) 
#endif

I try to understand the behavior of this expression through experiments. All the following are legal (compile well):

int foo(); // some function declaration
int (*fooPtr)(); // function pointer
void(foo);
void(fooPtr);
void(0);
(void)0;
void('a');
void("blabla");
exampleClass e; //some class named exampleClass with a default ctor
void(e);
static_cast<void>(e);

but these are not:

void(0) // no semicolon
int i = void(0);

Can I conclude from this that "void" (in the context of the 4th use) is simply a special type that any type can cast to it (whether it is c-style or cpp-style), and it can never be used as an lvalue or rvalue?

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5  
2 is only true about C++, in C an empty function's parameter list means the function takes any number of unspecified arguments. –  K-ballo Nov 6 '11 at 2:18
    
You can also return an expression that evaluates to void from a function whose return type is void. –  Seth Carnegie Nov 6 '11 at 2:27
    
@SethCarnegie: You can do that in C++, but not in C. In C, a void function can only have a bare return;. (C99 6.8.6.4p1.) –  Keith Thompson Nov 6 '11 at 2:32
    
Are you sure that void(e); compiles in C++? –  Kerrek SB Nov 6 '11 at 2:32
2  
@KerrekSB: void(e) == (void)e == static_cast<void>(e). It is a common idiom for expressing that a variable is deliberately not used. –  Mankarse Nov 6 '11 at 2:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Can I conclude from this that "void" (in the context of the 4th use) is simply a special type that any type can cast to it (whether it is c-style or cpp-style), and it can never be used as an lvalue or rvalue?

James McNellis pointed out in a comment above that void can be used as an rvalue via the expression void().

He quoted this from the current C++ standard:

C++11 §5.2.3/2:
“The expression T(), where T is a simple-type-specifier or typename-specifier for a non-array complete object type or the (possibly cv-qualified) void type, creates a prvalue of the specified type, which is value-initialized (no initialization is done for the void() case).”

This makes it possible to write code like …

template< class T >
T foo() { return T(); }

and use foo<void>() (most likely from other templated code, I would imagine).

Formally void is just an incomplete type that can never be completed.

Cheers & hth.

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As for your 2), in C these:

int foo();
int foo(void);

are not equivalent.

The first is an old-style declaration (still supported in the latest C standard) that says foo takes a fixed but unspecified number and type of argument(s). A call like foo(42) doesn't require a diagnostic, but its behavior is undefined unless the definition of foo says it has a single int parameter.

The second says specifically that foo takes no arguments, and foo(42) requires a diagnostic. The second declaration is a prototype; the first is not. The (void) syntax was added because some special syntax was needed to be able to declare a parameterless function without writing something that looks like an old-style declaration.

In new C code, you should always use prototypes. Old-style declarations are kept in the language only to support old code.

C++ dropped old-style declarations. In C++, the two declarations of foo are equivalent; the int foo(void) form is supported only for compatibility with C.

Your case 4) really has nothing directly to do with conditional compilation. Casting an expression to void is a way of evaluating the expression and explicitly discarding its value. It's often used to inhibit warnings. For example, if foo() returns an int result, then

foo();

as a standalone statement might trigger a warning that you're discarding the result, but

(void)foo();

probably tells the compiler that you intended to do so.

void is an incomplete type that cannot be completed. That means that an expression of type void can only be used in a context that doesn't expect a value. And you're right, an expression of type void cannot be used as an lvalue or rvalue. EDIT: Except in the case Alf described, and only in C++.

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int foo() and int foo(void) are equivalent in C++, not in C. –  Salvatore Previti Nov 6 '11 at 5:02
    
@SalvatorePreviti: I believe that's exactly what I said. –  Keith Thompson Nov 6 '11 at 6:13
    
Using casts to void to inhibit warnings is perverse, but it's rather useful when you want to create errors if somebody tries to use the value of a function-like macro that's intended not to return a value. –  R.. Nov 6 '11 at 7:22

Void is a type with no values. Since it has no values, expressions of type void can only be used for their side effects. Here are some corrections:

#1 Yes.

#2 As mentioned, is correct in C++ but incorrect in C.

int foo(); // In C, this is an "old-style" prototype
           // which doesn't declare its parameters

// Definition for the above function: valid in C, not valid in C++
int foo(int x, int y) { return x + y; }

#3 void* is a special type of generic pointer: Not quite. It is not portable to cast a function pointer to void* and back again.

void func(void);
void *x = func;
void (*f)(void) = func; // NOT portable

However, you can cast any function pointer to any other function pointer type in C, and back again, without worrying about portability.

#4 Also used to explicitly indicate to the compiler that a value is not needed.

// Generates "unused parameter warning"
int func(int x)
{
    return 3;
}

// Does not generate any warnings
int func(int x)
{
    (void) x;
    return 3;
}

I recommend always turning unused parameter warnings on for your projects, because they often let you catch simple typos.

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void is always an incomplete type, which means you can never instantiate any object of type void. Consequently there can't be any values of this type, neither L nor R. There can't be any lvalue of this type, though void() is an (p)rvalue. [Thanks to @James!]

For void*, three common uses come to mind: 1) it's big enough to hold any object pointer. 2) dynamic-cast to void pointer yields a pointer to the most derived type. 3) it's the type of raw memory pointers, i.e. the result type of std::malloc() and ::operator new(), the argument type of std::free() and ::operator delete(), and of placement-new. It shouldn't be used for anything else in strict C++, though it's also used in the latter role as the buffer argument for fread and fwrite in the C library.

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3  
void() creates an rvalue of type void (or, in C++11, a prvalue). –  James McNellis Nov 6 '11 at 2:34
1  
@JamesMcNellis: How can you have a value of an incomplete type? –  Kerrek SB Nov 6 '11 at 2:37
2  
C++11 §5.2.3/2: "The expression T(), where T is a simple-type-specifier or typename-specifier for a non-array complete object type or the (possibly cv-qualified) void type, creates a prvalue of the specified type, which is value-initialized (no initialization is done for the void() case)." –  James McNellis Nov 6 '11 at 2:50
    
@JamesMcNellis: Thanks! –  Kerrek SB Nov 6 '11 at 12:04

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