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Here's my code: http://pastebin.com/x8XKSufP

I need to format the output into proper binary format. For example, if you enter a decimal "64" I need it to output "0100 0000", NOT 1000000. I've been trying to figure this out for over an hour. Please help.

Test.java

import java.util.Scanner;

public class Test {
   public static int[] getBinaryArray(int decimal) {
      int result = decimal;
      int length = 0;
      while (result != 0) {
         result /= 2;
         length++;
      }
      return new int[length];
   } // close getBinaryArray method

   public static int[] decimalToBinary(int[] binary, int decimal) {
      int result = decimal;
      int arrayLength = binary.length - 1;
      while (result != 0) {
         if (result % 2 == 0) {
            binary[arrayLength] = 0;
         } else {
            binary[arrayLength] = 1;
         }
         arrayLength--;
         result /= 2;
      } // close WHILE
      return binary;
   } // close decimalToBinary method

   // Main method
   public static void main(String[] args) {
      // initialize the input scanner
      Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
      System.out.println("Enter a number in decimal format: ");
      int getDecimal = input.nextInt();
      int[] binary = decimalToBinary(getBinaryArray(getDecimal), getDecimal);
      for (int i = 0; i < binary.length; i++) {
         System.out.println(i + " " + binary[i]);
      } // close FOR
   } // main method
}
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If your length isn't a multiple of 8, prepend enough '0's until it is. –  Dave Newton Nov 6 '11 at 2:30
    
Rather than post a link to your code, post the code itself. Since this is your first question here, I've taken the liberty of doing this for you. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Nov 6 '11 at 2:34
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4 Answers 4

System.out.printf("%d%d%d%d %d%d%d%d", 
                (n&128)>0?1:0,
                 (n&64)>0?1:0, 
                 (n&32)>0?1:0, 
                 (n&16)>0?1:0,
                  (n&8)>0?1:0,
                  (n&4)>0?1:0, 
                  (n&2)>0?1:0, 
                   n&1) ;

... and so on.

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Converting to binaryString and then left padding zeros should do the trick.

Here is a simple example ( not accounting for large binary strings )

String s = Integer.toBinaryString(i);

int length = s.length();
int remainder = length % 8;
if ( remainder != 0 )
     length = length + (8 - remainder);

System.out.println(String.format("%0" + length + "d" , Integer.parseInt(s)));
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This does not add the space between bytes like the OP wants. –  ubiquibacon Nov 6 '11 at 3:13
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I don't know the "use" of your code, but here is my solution (Don't forget to import java.io) :

public static void main(String args[]) throws IOException {

    BufferedReader bf = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
    System.out.println("Enter the decimal value: ");
    String input = bf.readLine();

    // Parse the input
    int i = Integer.parseInt(input);

    String bin = null;
    String result = null;

    if ((Integer.toBinaryString(i).length() % 2) != 0) {
        bin = "0".concat(Integer.toBinaryString(i));
        // Formatting obtained binary
        result = (bin.substring(0, bin.length() / 2)).concat(" ").concat(
                bin.substring(bin.length() / 2, bin.length()));
    } else {
        bin = Integer.toBinaryString(i);
        //Formatting obtained binary
        result = (bin.substring(0, bin.length() / 2)).concat(" ").concat(
                bin.substring(bin.length() / 2, bin.length()));
    }

    System.out.println("Binary: " + result);
}

Enjoy :)

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This isn't nearly as clean as Kal's solution, but it does give you a space between every 4 bits as you asked for.

import java.util.Scanner;

class decimalToBinaryConverter {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int groupsOf = 4; //Change this to 8 if you want bytes instead of half bytes.
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);

        System.out.println("Enter a number in decimal format: ");

        int myInt = input.nextInt(); //Max in put value is of course max integer value, 2,147,483,647.  Does not work with negative values.
        int bitCount = Integer.SIZE - Integer.numberOfLeadingZeros(myInt); //Determines at what position the leading bit is.
        int zerosNeeded = groupsOf - (bitCount % groupsOf); //Determines how many 0s need to be added to the bit group to ensure the group is full.
        StringBuilder tempSB = new StringBuilder();
        StringBuilder resultSB = new StringBuilder();

        while (zerosNeeded > 0 && zerosNeeded != groupsOf) {
            tempSB.append(0);
            zerosNeeded--;
        }

        tempSB.append(Integer.toBinaryString(myInt)); //At this point tempSB has the correct bits in the correct places, but with no spaces.

        for (int i = 0; i < tempSB.length(); i++) {
            if (i % groupsOf == 0) {
                resultSB.append(" "); //Put a space in between each bit group.
            }
            resultSB.append(tempSB.charAt(i));
        }
        System.out.println(resultSB.toString().trim()); //Trim the extra space off the front of resultSB and print it.
    }
}
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