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My program calls function 183 (getcwd) of interrupt 80h which copies an absolute pathname of the current working directory to the memory location pointed to by buff, which is of length 4096. Returned absolute pathname length is usually less than 4096 bytes so i want to get its true length. How can i do that?

%define LF 0Ah      ; Line feed ASCII code.
%define STDOUT_FILENO 1 ; Standard output stream.
%define SYS_exit    1
%define SYS_write   4
%define SYS_getcwd  183
SECTION .bss
    buff resb 4096
SECTION .text
    global _start
_start:
    mov eax, SYS_getcwd ; getcwd
    mov ebx, buff
    mov ecx, 4096
    int 80h
    mov eax, SYS_write  ; print result to stdout
    mov ebx, STDOUT_FILENO
    mov ecx, buff
    mov edx, 4096
    int 80h
    mov eax, SYS_exit   ; exit
    mov ebx, 0
    int 80h

I add code to find length of null terminated string to my program as following and it works:

%define LF 0Ah      ; Line feed ASCII code.
%define STDOUT_FILENO 1 ; Standard output stream.
%define SYS_exit    1
%define SYS_write   4
%define SYS_getcwd  183
SECTION .data
    mesg1 db "Can't not find string length.",LF
    mesg1_l db $-mesg1
SECTION .bss
    buff resb 4096
SECTION .text
    global _start
_start:
    mov eax, SYS_getcwd ; getcwd
    mov ebx, buff
    mov ecx, 4096
    int 80h
    mov al, 0       ; find string length with scasb
    mov edi, buff
    cld
    repne scasb
    jne error1
    sub ecx, 4096
    neg ecx
    mov edx,ecx
print:  mov byte [buff + ecx],LF
    mov byte [buff + ecx + 1], 0
    inc edx
    mov eax, SYS_write  ; print result to stdout
    mov ebx, STDOUT_FILENO
    mov ecx, buff
    int 80h
    jmp exit
error1: mov eax, SYS_write
    mov ebx, STDOUT_FILENO
    mov ecx, error1 
    mov edx, mesg1_l
    int 80h
exit:   mov eax, SYS_exit   ; exit
    mov ebx, 0
    int 80h
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3 Answers 3

Q: How do I find the length of a string (e.g. the string returned by "getcwd()")?

A: The same way the standard library function "strlen()" would do it: parse the string until you find a '\0' delimiter, then return that position as the string length.

PS: I'd strongly urge you to consider using Gnu Assembler "gas" instead of "nasm". As soon as you start playing with assemblers other than x86, the "bass-ackwards" Intel syntax gets really annoying.

IMHO ...

share|improve this answer
    
How do you know that it is a null terminated string? I already known to programming with "Gas" but i will program in "Nasm" for sometime more. The day i use assemblers other than x86 still very far away. –  Linh Dao Nov 6 '11 at 4:15
    
I add code to find length of null terminated string to my program as following but it doesn't work too: –  Linh Dao Nov 6 '11 at 4:24
1  
Hi - It is a null terminated string. I noticed you edited your question with your "strlen()". Take a look at these alternatives, and see if they might work for you: objectmix.com/asm-x86-asm-370/… –  paulsm4 Nov 6 '11 at 5:14
    
Thank you! paulsm4. –  Linh Dao Nov 6 '11 at 16:24
    
I was a click away from -1'ing this for calling the Intel syntax "bass-ackwards". –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Jul 23 '12 at 21:19

Your strlen routine (scasb) would work with ecx = -1, but not with ecx = 4096 I think. Try that.

Edit: I didn't notice that you subtracted 4096. That should work. Sorry.

I notice that "getcwd" is kinda "funny". It is a system call, but appears in "man 3", not "man 2" as expected. No idea why.

Best, Frank

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This is not an answer to your question; it is a reminder that you should not make system calls yourself. Even if you insist on programming in assembly (why?) you should let the C library make system calls for you, because:

  • It knows how to set errno.
  • It will insulate you from low-level ABI variations that you don't want to have to know about.
  • It will automatically use the most efficient available trap sequence, such as using sysenter or syscall rather than int when possible.

All the system calls are available as regular old C functions. Here's your program adjusted to do this properly:

SECTION .bss
    buff resb 4096
SECTION .text
    global main
main:
    push  ebp
    mov   ebp, esp
    and   esp, 0xfffffff0
    sub   esp, 16

    mov   dword ptr [esp+4], 4096
    mov   dword ptr [esp],   buff
    call  getcwd

    mov   dword ptr [esp+8], 4096
    mov   dword ptr [esp+4], buff
    mov   dword ptr [esp],   1
    call  write

    ; exit by returning from main
    xor   eax, eax
    leave
    ret

(The gunk at the top of main ensures 16-byte stack pointer alignment, which is required by the ABI.)

share|improve this answer
    
I completely disagree! Sure, in production code it's clearly preferred to stay as high-level as possible. But for LEARNING PURPOSES, there are few BETTER ways to learn than to try things directly, without any of the "middle stuff". I would strongly encourage EVERY developer to play with their own "int 80" in assembler. As well as link in and call the standard C libraries in assembler. But for learning only, not for production code. –  paulsm4 Nov 6 '11 at 19:12
    
PS: Here's a good discussion of "int 0x80" vs "Sysenter/Sysexit": articles.manugarg.com/systemcallinlinux2_6.html But again, for EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES, "int 0x80" is fine! –  paulsm4 Nov 6 '11 at 19:17
    
@Zack, I don't think your code is written in NASM, it looks like MASM code. I'm newbie to assembly so i decide to do some string manipulation program for practicing purpose. In fact, i'm writing a simple shell-like assembly program which can accept commands for file listing, file copying, file creating within linux Os or without any os if i can write my program fast enough, i only have 18 days left to write this program. I just can't write interrupts myself so i temporarily use linux syscalls. –  Linh Dao Nov 7 '11 at 12:47
    
I don't speak any variety of Intel-syntax assembly, so I wrote the demo program in GAS syntax, assembled it, and ran it through objdump -d -Mintel. I hope the result is close enough to something that NASM will understand to be of use to you. –  Zack Nov 7 '11 at 16:02

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