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I have a Main list .sortable and 3 or more other lists connected that I want a person to drag an item and drop which works great and its easy. But i want to be able to limit the new list to 1 item, and they can also drag that item back if they changed their mind and drag a new one.

example what i have so far: http://jsfiddle.net/TQqdF/25/

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

In the receive option, run some logic and then call 'cancel' on the ui.sender utility object:

$('#main_list,ul').sortable({
        placeholder: 'placeholder',
        connectWith: '.connect_lists',
        receive: function(event, ui) {
            var $this = $(this);
            if ($this.children('li').length > 1 && $this.attr('id') != "main_list") {
                console.log('Only one per list!');
                $(ui.sender).sortable('cancel');
            }
        }
    });

http://jsfiddle.net/TQqdF/62/

[Updated as per John's helpful and correct comment!]

[Update: If it's not one thing it's another! Now it seems that there's no way to avoid the animation (revert: true that you set). However, I have a partial solution for the problem mentioned further in the comment thread.

If you use absolutely positioned LI elements inside a relatively positioned UL, new items being added will not push the others out of the way. However, you do need to explicitly declare that those same LI items are statically positioned when inside the draggables container. Here's the CSS I threw at the bottom of your existing code:

#droppables ul { position: relative; }
#droppables li { position: absolute; top: 3px; left: 3px; }
#draggables li { position: static; }

And a fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/w38dK/5/

So, the main thing left is that it animates before being rejected and reverting. I had a poke around the docs and I couldn't find a way to resolve it. Perhaps a second question on Stack Overflow specifically regarding that issue?

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Quick question what the heck does cancel do? i tried googling about it but no answer. Also the documentation sayings not much about it. – c3cris Nov 6 '11 at 3:51
    
It's a method specific to the jQuery UI framework and its Sortable interaction. All it does is revert the elements back to the state they were in before the sort started. It works by passing the 'ui' object into the receive parameter's function, meaning you then have access to the sender within (ui.sender). The interaction's .sortable() method happens to have an option called 'cancel' which does the reverting I mentioned. Not sure if that answers your question. ;-) – Greg Pettit Nov 6 '11 at 3:56
    
@Greg Pettit, doh you got here first while I was trying to figure it out.. I had left off the function(event, ui) part so wasn't getting the ui to fire. You'll want to make sure to ignore the main_list though so you can move items back to it. – John Nov 6 '11 at 3:59
    
Ironically, I was taking my time rather than rushing to an answer like so many people do (grr), but I still missed that main_list logic that you correctly identify as necessary to the whole thing. Good catch! Upped your answer 'coz that logic is a requirement! – Greg Pettit Nov 6 '11 at 4:05
    
Hey its fun trying to answer questions here, I learned how to do this trying to answer the question :), +1 to you :) – John Nov 6 '11 at 4:09

If anyone is still interested, I took a slightly different approach to solving this problem.

Instead of using the receive event, I use mousedown and mouseup events on the list items to detect whether the target lists are at their max or not.

This essentially disables the target lists upon click if they are already full. This means no nasty placeholder.

$('.sortable li').mousedown(function() {
    $('.sortable').not($(this).parent()).each(function() {
        if ($(this).find('li').length >= 1) {
            if ($(this).attr('id') != "main_list" ) {
                $(this).sortable('disable');
            }
        }
    });
});
$('.sortable li').mouseup(function() {
    $('.sortable').each(function() {
        $(this).sortable('enable');
    });
});

Full jsfiddle is here: http://jsfiddle.net/P9bS8/

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Thanks, this approach worked perfectly for me :) – Andyweb Oct 21 '13 at 14:40
    
Glad it helped someone :) – dalemac Oct 31 '13 at 14:46

You'll want to use the receive event and make sure to ignore the main_list so you can put items back.

 $('#main_list,ul').sortable({
        placeholder:'placeholder',
        connectWith: '.connect_lists',
        receive: function(event, ui) {
            var list = $(this);
            if (list.attr('id') != "main_list") {
                if (list.children().length > 1) {
                    alert("More than 1!");
                    // move item back to main_list
                    $(ui.sender).sortable('cancel');
                }
            }
        }
    });

Check the events section on jqueryui sortable

http://jsfiddle.net/TQqdF/61/

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Here is my version: http://jsfiddle.net/DwXnV/3

Dragged item replaces content of target list. Replaced item is moved to origin list. Assumed that each target list can contain only 1 item.

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Whilst this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. – oers Feb 27 '12 at 8:49

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