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I am new to C++ and I want to know whether following code is prone to memory leak. Here I am using a std::ostream pointer to redirect output to either console or to a file. For this I am calling new operator for std::ofstream.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

int main() {
    bool bDump;

    std::cout << "bDump bool" << std::endl;
    std::cin >> bDump;

    std::ostream *osPtr;

    if (bDump) {
        osPtr = new std::ofstream("dump.txt");
    } else {
        osPtr = &std::cout;
    }

    *osPtr << "hello";
    return 0;
}

And one more thing, I have not closed the file which I opened while calling constructor for ofstream. Do we have any potential data loss situation here. as file is not closed.

share|improve this question
1  
Memory leaks don't happen in the main function, unless if you have something like a for/while. –  Radu Nov 6 '11 at 5:35
2  
@Radu: Now that depends on your definition of memory leak, now doesn't it? –  Dennis Zickefoose Nov 6 '11 at 6:19
    
I believe this is technically undefined behavior: 3.8 [basic.life]/4 "For an object of a class type with a non-trivial destructor, ... if a delete-expression is not used to release the storage, the destructor shall not be implicitly called and any program that depends on the side effects produced by the destructor has undefined behavior." So by the letter of the standard, when main ends if bDump is true this program could request some shared memory from the OS then end abrupty such that it is never reclaimed, resulting in an actual, permanent memory leak. –  Dennis Zickefoose Nov 6 '11 at 6:49
    
@DennisZickefoose: You would be correct that this has undefined behavior if it depends on the side effects produced by the destructor. But it doesn't. And you'd be correct that it would have a memory leak if the destructor released some such resource to the OS. But it doesn't. (So, no it doesn't have a memory leak. No it doesn't have undefined behavior. Yes, this type of of code is prone to memory leaks.) –  David Schwartz Nov 7 '11 at 17:26
    
@David: Assuming bdump is true: If the destructor is called, the file "dump.txt" will contain the text "hello". If the destructor is not called, the file "dump.txt" will not contain the text "hello". I agree with you that, in general, leaks like this are not a problem on modern systems. But only if the object in question has a trivial destructor... ofstream does not qualify. –  Dennis Zickefoose Nov 7 '11 at 17:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As @Mahmoud Al-Qudsi mentioned anything you new must also be deleted otherwise it will be leaked.

In most situation you do not want to use delete but rather you want to use a smart pointer to auto-delete the object. This is because in situations with exceptions you could again leak memory (while RAII) the smart pointer will guarantee that the object is deleted and thus the destructor is called.

It is important the at the destructor is called (especially in this case). If you do not call the destructor there is a potential that the not everything in the stream will be flushed to the underlying file.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

int doStuff()
{
    try
    {
        bool bDump;

        std::cout<<"bDump bool"<<std::endl;
        std::cin>>bDump;

        // Smart pointer to store any dynamic object.
        std::auto_ptr<std::ofstream>   osPtr;

        if(bDump)
        {
            // If needed create a file stream
            osPtr.reset(new std::ofstream("dump.txt"));
        } 

        // Create a reference to the correct stream.
        std::ostream&  log = bDump ? *osPtr : std::cout;

        log << "hello";
     }
     catch(...) {throw;}

 } // Smart pointer will correctly delete the fstream if it exists.
   // This makes sure the destructor is called.
   // This is guaranteed even if exceptions are used. 
share|improve this answer

Yes. Definitely. Any time you call new without delete, there's a memory leak.

After your code has executed, you need to add this:

        if(bDump)
        {
            delete osPtr;
        }
share|improve this answer
3  
@lvella: And at the end of main, the memory is unrecoverably lost. –  Dennis Zickefoose Nov 6 '11 at 6:20
1  
You definitely want to use smart pointers here. In the case of an exception you want the destructor to correctly close the stream. –  Loki Astari Nov 6 '11 at 6:23
1  
@lvella: Lost to the program, obviously. How do you propose to flush any remaining output without osPtr floating around anymore? –  Dennis Zickefoose Nov 6 '11 at 6:41
2  
If you don't call the destructor then I would considered the resource leaked. What happens if the object is a link to the space station. I am sure that NASA will be really pissed if you don't cleanly close the connection. –  Loki Astari Nov 6 '11 at 6:42
1  
@David Schwartz: I am curious on how you call the destructor on a leaked object. Though the issues can be distinct in C++ they are the same as we are dealing with objects not plain memory (objects are a resource that can be leaked). Any object that is leaked (as in this case) will not have its destructor called. Thus the resource is leaked. –  Loki Astari Nov 6 '11 at 17:02

Yes, anything that is newed but never deleteed leaks.

In some cases, it is perfectly reasonable to allocate left right and center, and then just exit, particularly for short-lived batch-style programs, but as a general rule you should delete everything you new and delete[] everything you new[].

Especially in the case above, leaking the object is unsafe, since the object being leaked is an ostream that will never write unflushed content.

share|improve this answer
3  
I really, really don't recommend ever telling people about it being OK to allocate and not delete. That's something that you'll discover on your own when, if, and only you truly need it. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Nov 6 '11 at 5:40
    
@MahmoudAl-Qudsi: I agree that it is a hazardous practice that should be used with caution, but I don't agree with shielding developers from reality, especially when it can give them insights into the machinery behind the veil. –  Marcelo Cantos Nov 6 '11 at 5:47
    
I understand what you're saying completely - I just feel that certain practices and methods are best discovered by one's self. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Nov 6 '11 at 5:50

There is no leak in the code shown. At all times during the execution, all allocated objects are referenceable. There is only a memory leak if an object has been allocated and cannot be referenced in any way.

If the pointer goes out of scope, or its value is changed, without the object being deallocated, that is a memory leak. But so long as the pointer is in the outermost scope and nothing else changes its value, there is no leak.

"In object-oriented programming, a memory leak happens when an object is stored in memory but cannot be accessed by the running code." Wikipedia -- 'Memory leak'

The other answers suggest that any program that uses typical singleton patterns or doesn't free all allocated objects prior to termination has a memory leak. This is, IMO, quite silly. In any event, if you accept that definition, almost every real world program or library has a memory leak, and memory leaks are certainly not all bad.

In a sense, this kind of coding is prone to a memory leak, because it's easy to change the value of the pointer or let it go out of scope. In that case, there is an actual leak. But as shown, there is no leak.

You may have a different problem though: If the destructor has side-effects, not calling it can result in incorrect operation. For example, if you never call the destructor on a buffered output stream writing to a file, the last writes may never actually happen because the buffer didn't get flushed to the file.

share|improve this answer
1  
Not freeing all objects before termination is a memory leak, just one most modern OSes clean up for you. It's the memory leak that is occurring in the example code, in fact. In many cases, singletons and other objects are destroyed by the system when the module is unmapped and don't necessarily leak. This answer is mostly incorrect. –  ssube Nov 6 '11 at 6:02
1  
In fact, since osPtr is going out of scope without the object being deallocated, your definition of memory leak matches what is happening. –  ssube Nov 6 '11 at 6:09
1  
I also deemed the answer incorrect at first, but now I think it is correct. Technically, there is a leak, but actually - there isn't. The lifetime of osPtr matches the lifetime of the program, so no actual leak can happen. But still, I think it's a bad coding style. For example, most memory analyzers will report this as a leak. –  Violet Giraffe Nov 6 '11 at 6:11
2  
@Alex It is certainly bad style. However, there is a leak, the pointer goes out of scope and the memory is lost and never deallocated by the program. It's simply a short-lived leak, as the OS steps in to clean up for you. Still a very real leak, and similar code in any other function could cause serious problems. –  ssube Nov 6 '11 at 6:18
4  
This is a perfect case of a real leak. At the end the fstream pointer is lost. If it is not deleted then the stream is not closed. If the stream is not closed there is a potential for data not to be flushed to the file. Leaking memory is not really about the memory it is about the resources not be correctly destroyed via the destructor. Memory is just the simplest example of a resource but the principle applies to all object allocated in memory. –  Loki Astari Nov 6 '11 at 6:28

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