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I am trying to calculate the inverse of a BezierFunction[]'s x-component, defined, for example, by

fx[u_] := BezierFunction[{{0, 0}, {1/8, 3/4}, {1, 1}}][u][[1]]

which is the blue curve in the following plot:

fx(u) from BezierFunction

This curve clearly has a unique inverse for 0 ≤ u ≤1, as shown, for example, by the red dashed lines, which intersect at the coordinate {0.4,fx[0.4]} == {0.4, 0.22}.

In[1]:=  fx[0.4]
Out[1]:= 0.22

In[2]:=  fx[0.4] == 0.22
Out[2]:= True

So I am surprised by the following:

In[3]:= FindRoot[fx[u] == 0.22, {u,0.4}]
Out[3]:= {u->0.22}

and

In[4]:= InverseFunction[fx][0.22]
Out[4]:= 0.22

I found nothing in the documentation on the interaction of InverseFunction with BezierFunction, or Part. Anyone know of a way to extract the inverse of the BezierFunction's x-component?

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2  
Oops, I had a typo in the BezierFunction points. Fixed above: the middle point should be {1/8,3/4} to match the plot and the examples given. –  JxB Nov 6 '11 at 6:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are being bitten by an old issue that comes up again and again. You need to restrict the function to numeric arguments, or you are doing a part extraction on an unevaluated expression, yielding merely u.

Try this:

Clear[fx]

fx[u_?NumericQ] := 
 BezierFunction[{{0, 0}, {1/8, 3/4}, {1, 1}}][u][[1]]

FindRoot[fx[u] == 0.22, {u, 0.3, 0.5}]
(* Out[]=  0.4 *)

Also, InverseFunction does not actually find the inverse of a function, but rather is a symbolic representation of the inverse.

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Thank you @Mr. I will commit the ?NumericQ concept to memory. –  JxB Nov 7 '11 at 1:10

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