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I am in a chapter for control structures, i threw myself a while n case challenge but i can't seem to get it working, any heads up ?, i know my code is a bit dirty or alot dirty :D anyway the code is about asking a user for input on a color name then prints a corresponding color code, after that it asks if you want to continue if yes it continues if not it terminates.

#include <stdio.h>


main ()
{
    char color[20];
    char answer;
    printf("Enter the color name: ");
    scanf("%s", &color);

    while (1) {
     switch("color")
     {
        case "red":
            printf("#FF0000\n");
            break;
        case "green":
            printf("#00FF00\n");
            break;
        default:
            printf("FFFFFF\n");
     }
     printf("Do you want to do that again(y/n): ");
     scanf("%c", &answer);
     if (answer == "y")
     {
         printf("Enter the color code: ");
         scanf("%s",&color);
     }
     else
     {
         printf("Quiting.......\n");
         break;
     }
     }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
3  
main should have a return type of int. – Etienne de Martel Nov 6 '11 at 7:04
3  
It has an (implicit) return type of int; it is not good C89 code (and not valid C99 code). – Jonathan Leffler Nov 6 '11 at 7:04
3  
Learn about your compiler's warning options and turn them on. – mu is too short Nov 6 '11 at 7:06

There's more than one problem, but here's a few:

You're not comparing strings the right way. In C you can't use == to compare strings, you have to use strcmp (or strncmp).

You can't switch on a string in C. So you might want to replace the switch with if-else:

if (!strcmp(color, "red"))
    /* ... */
else if (!strcmp(color, "green"))
    /* ... */
else
    /* "default" */

You're mixing different scanf strategies:

  • scanf("%s",&color); leaves \n in the input buffer
  • scanf("%c", &answer); reads that newline and stores it in answer

Basically the only good advice is: keep studying. You're not ready for this "challenge" yet.

share|improve this answer
    
I want to thank you for pointing me to the right direction, i would say the book doesn't have enough examples, to get you on the track and sometimes you have to learn the hard way, well at least i have learnt that you cant compare strings with "==" which lead to me to learn a new function for comparing strings "strcmp()" and the concept for "%s" & "%c" in scanf, – Brian J Voorhees Nov 6 '11 at 13:41

Your switch statement always goes to default:. This is because you have the litaral "color" instead of the variable color.

You want

switch(color) {

but as pointed by others, that won't work either, because C switch doesn't allow strings.

share|improve this answer
    
That's the core of the problem - but using the alternative you suggest won't work either... – Jonathan Leffler Nov 6 '11 at 7:07

You want to write:

switch (color)
{
...
}

but even that won't work since you need an integer expression; C does not handle string comparisons natively.

So, you'll either have to map the colour strings to integers, or forego a switch and use an `if / else if / else' chain:

if (strcmp(color, "red") == 0)
    printf("#FF0000\n");
else if (strcmp(color, "green") == 0)
    printf("#00FF00\n");
else
    printf("FFFFFF\n");
share|improve this answer

To answer your question, you have to remember what is a string literal in C.

They are pointers to character arrays with string data embedded in the code by the compiler.

So, firstly, your switch statement uses a constant (address of "color" string) as a control variable.

Secondly, each case branch contains a meaningless address of a string as a label.

To emulate switch on strings in C, you have to use a sequence of if-else if with strcmp in conditions.

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