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The folowing program is intended to store words alphabetically in the Binary Search Tree using the strcmp function. The issue, detailed under the program, is that no pointer is passed in the recursive call of the function in the last part of the function.

typedef struct NodT{
   char word[30];
   struct NodT *left, *right;
} NOD;

void reset_field(NOD *nod){
    int i;
    for(i=0; i<30; i++){
        nod->word[i]='\0';
    }
}

void enter_recursively(NOD *nod, char *word){
    if(nod==NULL){
        nod= (NOD *) malloc(sizeof(NOD));
       nod->left=NULL;
       nod->right=NULL;
       reset_field(nod);
       strcpy(nod->word, word);
       return;
   }

   if(nod->word[0]=='\0'){
       strcpy(nod->word, word);
       return;
   }

   if(strcmp(nod->word, word)==0) return;

   if(strcmp(nod->word, word)<0){
       enter_recursively(nod->right, word);//the problem seems to be here
       printf("right\n");
   }
   else{
       enter_recursively(nod->left, word);//...and here
       printf("left\n");
   }
   //the NULL pointer is being sent over, which is peculiar
}

The thing is that, when I pass the pointers(left, right) from the structure to the recursive function in the if-else conditions, it takes a NULL value on the other side, which it shouldn't do because they are not NULL after alocating the first word in the root and the second in the right or left depending on strcmp, alocation when malloc is used to create the new storage space for the word.

UPDATE: The new script using double pointers:

typedef struct NodT{
    int key;
    char word[30];
    struct NodT *left, *right;
} NOD;

void enter_recursively(NOD **nod, char *word){
        printf("N: %p\n", nod);
    printf("NL: %p\n", (**nod).left);
    printf("NR: %p\n", (**nod).right);
        if(nod==NULL){
            nod=malloc(sizeof(NOD));        
            (**nod).left=NULL;
            (**nod).right=NULL;
            strcpy((**nod).word, word);
            return;
        }
        if((**nod).word[0]=='\0'){
            strcpy((**nod).word, word);
            return;
        }

    if(strcmp((**nod).word, word)==0) return;

        if(strcmp((**nod).word, word)<0){
            enter_recursively((**nod).right, word);
        }
        else{
            enter_recursively((**nod).left, word);
        }

I get segmentation fault and I don't know why.

share|improve this question
    
Put the check nod == NULL (or just nod :) before you ever try to access its contents. You are probably just dumping your stack with these accesses. –  Jens Gustedt Nov 6 '11 at 11:03
2  
Please enable warnings on your compiler, you're using return; in a non-void function which makes no sense. Also your fist NULL check will never match, you'll segfault before that if nod is null at function entry. –  Mat Nov 6 '11 at 11:04
    
oh sorry, I've reedited. Made the return; to make sense now –  Andrew G.H. Nov 6 '11 at 11:07
    
This is not directly related to your issue, but for (i = 0; i < 30; i++) { nod->word[0] = '\0'; } makes no sense. –  pmg Nov 6 '11 at 11:09
    
@pmg, that is just a function I use to clear all the string for writing to file. I've added it in case some of you find it affecting the other functions. Oh...my bad I didn't gave attention to that function until now. It should be word[i] there. –  Andrew G.H. Nov 6 '11 at 11:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that *nod is modified but not returned: Change

void enter_recursively(NOD *nod, char *word)

by

void enter_recursively(NOD **nod, char *word)

in order to return legal pointer. Inside the function, use *nod instead nod, this is the correct way.

When you pass only NOD * to the function, the allocated memory is not stored properly. Is like when you want to modify a int value inside a function, you pass its address, instead the value.

Besides, verify always null pointers before use them. You can obtain a core.

The final code seams like:

void enter_recursively(NOD **nod, char *word){
    if (*nod==NULL){
        *nod=malloc(sizeof(NOD));        
        (*nod)->left=NULL;
        (*nod)->right=NULL;
        strcpy((*nod)->word, word);
        return;
    }
    if((*nod)->word[0]=='\0'){
        strcpy((*nod)->word, word);
        return;
    }

    if(strcmp((*nod)->word, word)==0) return;

    if(strcmp((*nod)->word, word)<0){
        enter_recursively(&(*nod)->right, word);
    }
    else{
        enter_recursively(&(*nod)->left, word);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I've used NOD *nod in a problem with linked lists, and returned the pointer very well. What's different? Could you explain to me why double pointers would do better? –  Andrew G.H. Nov 6 '11 at 11:24
    
See my answer edition –  Tio Pepe Nov 6 '11 at 11:49
    
Oh man... if this is the most simple form of creating nodes for a BST ...it's pretty complicated. Does anyone know a more simple way to make a simple BSTree? –  Andrew G.H. Nov 6 '11 at 12:53

Your enter_recursively() function allocates a node, maybe even assigns to it, but has no way to pass it back to the caller. Find a way to return something useful to the caller.

UPDATE: for completeness: this is the other way of communicating information from the child back to to its parent: (via the return value)

NOD * enter_recursively(NOD *ptr, char *word){
    int rc;

    if (ptr==NULL){
       ptr = malloc(sizeof *ptr);
       ptr->left = NULL;
       ptr->right = NULL;
       strcpy(ptr->word, word);
       return ptr;
   }

   rc = strcmp(ptr->word, word);
   if (rc==0) return ptr;

   if (rc < 0){
       ptr->right = enter_recursively(ptr->right, word);
       fprintf(stderr, "right\n");
   }
   else {
       ptr->left = enter_recursively(ptr->left, word);
       fprintf(stderr, "left\n");
   }
   return ptr; /* not reached */
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've reedited, erased the pointers *right and *left from the function and addes nod->left and nod->right to recursive call, which I have used in the first, original program, that also, didn't work. I'll try the double pointer as Tio Pepe suggested in the other answer. –  Andrew G.H. Nov 6 '11 at 11:22
    
Basically, there are two ways of passing back information from a function to its caller. The obvious way is using the return value. The other way is by using a pointer argument (in this case a pointer to pointer, because the thing you want to communicate is a pointer) A third method, using a global variable, is possible but not advisable. –  wildplasser Nov 6 '11 at 11:45
    
What if instead using a pointer to a pointer, you would copy the adress stored by a pointer to another pointer and reffer to the value that is pointed to using the brand new pointer in which the adress has been copied? (as i tryed) –  Andrew G.H. Nov 6 '11 at 13:08
    
If you want to understand it, start by assuming that the result would not be a pointer but an int. In that case you could either have "int func(...) { return 42; }" or "void func(int *p, ...) { *p = 42; }". Now, replace int by *NOD, and you are almost there. –  wildplasser Nov 6 '11 at 13:56

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