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I have a few edittexts and a button. On click of the button, I do some action with edittext values. I wish to check if all edittexts are filled in before I proceed. So I use code in onclick listener

if("".equals(etLandSize.getText().toString()) || null == etLandSize.getText().toString())
    {
        Toast toast = Toast.makeText(context, text, duration);
        toast.show();

        return;
    }

//followed by some actions.

If the above condition goes true, I expect the method to return without doing anything by using a 'return'.

My problem is that even when the condition is going true, the lines following this condition are executing and I see the NPEs from log since the fields are empty.

If I comment all the lines after this condition, only then I see the expected Toast and my Activity remains there, which is normal behavior.

Am I doing something wrong here?

An alternate is that i can put the code following condition in else{} block. But just wondering why I cannot use a return. Apologies if I'm not realising some basic mistake.

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please don't use Yoda conditions necronet.info/2011/02/why-i-hate-joda-conditions.html, and can we see your logcat. If i had to guess I would say that context it's null but without the log It is just a guess! –  Necronet Nov 6 '11 at 11:17
1  
"even when the condition is going true": How do you know for certain that the condition is actually true? –  Mark Byers Nov 6 '11 at 11:17
    
If context is null, at most makeText will throw an exception. It still doesn't explain why the code after the 'return' gets to run. –  zmbq Nov 6 '11 at 11:27
    
@MarkByers, Im sure of condition going true because when i remove the code after the condition, the code inside condition is executing as expected. When there is something after the condition, that too is executing which is not expected. –  Chinni Krishna Nov 6 '11 at 11:49
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your condition looks weird.

I'm pretty sure null == etLandSize.getText().toString() will never be true, and I would use

etLandSize.getText().length() == 0

instead of "".equals(etLandSize.getText().toString(), since using "" to avoid comparisson with null is not usefull here - toString() cannot return null.

So try this:

if (etLandSize.getText().length() == 0)
{
    Toast toast = Toast.makeText(context, text, duration);
    toast.show();

    return;
}

BTW: if your return; is within try {} block, then part of the coded located in finally{} block will be run after it.

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I'm curious - you accepted this as the best answer because it solved the problem? –  zmbq Nov 6 '11 at 12:57
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It's hard to answer without further information (where is this code places? Who calls this function? etc...)

As a ground rule, when you find that something as basic as 'return' is broken, it's not the cause of the problem. It's highly unlikely you managed to find a very peculiar bug in the JVM.

If you are certain the if condition is indeed true, I'm guessing your function gets called twice, and in one of those calls the condition isn't true.

Itay.

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I was experimenting with the conditions and was here when i posted the problem. I'm certain the condition is true because if i comment out the rest of code, the code inside condition is executing for my test case. –  Chinni Krishna Nov 6 '11 at 11:46
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Do not use return inside conditional blocks or at the middle of methods. Always use return ONLY at the end of methods.

In your case, put your //followed by some actions in "else" block. Also you can check for text, consider using trim() and length() on the returned string.

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3  
That's a strong viewpoint. Care to say why? –  Mark Byers Nov 6 '11 at 11:19
    
But that should work right? There is no restriction as such to my knowledge. –  Chinni Krishna Nov 6 '11 at 11:19
    
yes @Chinni it will work, some developer think that it's bad practice or will be harder to read, but as many things in life it depends on the case –  Necronet Nov 6 '11 at 11:21
1  
Unless you have very deeply nested code, returning inside an if is perfectly valid. The problem isn't the return, but the nesting which makes the code non-comprehensible. In constrast, an additional else block would make the code more bloated, as it is totally unnecessary. –  Femaref Nov 6 '11 at 11:24
    
using returns on a bunch of places inside one methods makes it harder to understand/evaluate while reading. Using return to terminate a method before completing all statements in the method, means you probably should consider refactoring...list goes on. Of course, the code above would work and of course it depends on personal view... –  hovanessyan Nov 6 '11 at 11:36
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