Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a simple question, how to convert this server into multithreded as far as now it is dealing with only one client. Which part should go into run() part :)?

ServerSocket listener = new ServerSocket(9090);
System.out.println("server\n");
try {
    while (true) {
        Socket socket = listener.accept();
        System.out.println(socket+" " + "welcome\n");
        try { 
            PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter(socket.getOutputStream(), true);
            out.println(new Date().toString());
            BufferedReader input = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(socket.getInputStream()));
            String answer = input.readLine();
            System.out.println(answer);
            if("hej".equals(answer)){
                System.out.println("Sacrafice accepted");
            }
        } finally {
            socket.close();
        }
    }
} finally {
    listener.close();
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Serving each connection returned from accept should go into a separate thread, i.e. the following should be moved into the run() method:

System.out.println(socket + " " + "welcome\n");
try {
    PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter(socket.getOutputStream(), true);
    out.println(new Date().toString());
    BufferedReader input = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(socket.getInputStream()));
    String answer = input.readLine();
    System.out.println(answer);
    if ("hej".equals(answer)) {
        System.out.println("Sacrafice accepted");
    }
}
finally {
    socket.close();
}

Of course, you'll need to add code that creates a thread. Since thread creation is an expensive task and threads are reusable it's best to create a number of worker threads in a pool up-front during initialization and then only retrieve worker threads from the pool once you accept a connection and need a thread to service it. As you develop your application you may find that adding some logic to adjust thread pool size at run time based on load is a good idea, but you should probably abstain from this at the current stage and just use a configuration item (like a command line option or a static final) to set the initial thread pool size. You can find thread pool implementations in java.util.concurrent.

If you do that, thread's run() method will be very simple waiting in a loop for new tasks and every time it receives a task it should run that task's run() method. The code above should be put into task's not thread's run() method. This way you will separate threads from tasks and hence make sure threads remain reusable. Threads will also need a method to receive tasks and that method should thread-safe. You can use one of the queue implementations from java.util.concurrent to store tasks in your threads between the time they're passing into a thread for servicing and the time they're taken out of the queue by thread's run() method to actually run them.

This separation of threads and tasks is yet another case when adding another level of indirection solves an important software engineering problem.

share|improve this answer
1  
Better than implementing a pool of threads based on a queue, just use an ExecutorService, which implements the pooling and the queuing for you. –  JB Nizet Nov 6 '11 at 11:36
    
That's right. This is just a design outline and as always, it is a good idea to check whether existing and proven implementation solves your problem. Either way, understanding the design helps both to implement your own solution and to use an existing solution effectively. Thanks for adding the mention of the relevant existing solution. –  Adam Zalcman Nov 6 '11 at 11:45

Use one thread per each client connection. The basic flow of logic in such a multi-client server is this:

while (true) {
    accept a connection ;
    get a thread from pool to deal with the client ;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Again, this way you will end up creating a new thread every time a connection arrives which hurts performance. Use a thread pool or an executor that already provides you with one, e.g.: download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/… –  Adam Zalcman Nov 6 '11 at 11:50
    
Thanks Zalcman, I would edit my post from 'create' to 'get' –  user1032113 Nov 6 '11 at 11:54

The part after listener.accept(). Once the main thread has received a connection from a client, let another thread (pooled, preferrably) handle the communication with this client so that the main thread can accept another one.

Use a ThreadPoolExecutor to do this: each time a connection is accepted, construct a new Runnable instance and make it execute by the executor.

share|improve this answer

create a class serverThread, inherit from Thread, to declare a constructor that takes a socket in the Run () method copy the entire try {} catch {}

google translated

share|improve this answer
    
It's debatable whether you should inherit from thread (as opposed to implementing Runnable interface). Arguably, inheritable should be reserved for the case when you want to create something which is a thread. Here, I think the code after accept() should go into tasks implementation rather than thread implementation to separate the two allowing thread reuse (which is a good idea given the cost of creating and dropping threads at runtime). –  Adam Zalcman Nov 6 '11 at 11:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.