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I have a HUGE solution in VS2010. there are about 60 projects (class libraries at most and 3rd party dependencies I need to install) and more than 60 projects of setup project type.

Of course, I want to be able to compile the solution to both platforms - x64 and x86

My question is: is there a simple way to do so? Like, its not reasonable to go through each project properties each time and switch between x64 and x86.

I have classic solution - split to 2 solutions, one for x64 and another for x86.

The way I was thinking about, is to have like a master project in the solution, and all other project depended on its configuration - so if the project is set to x64 all of the solution will compile as x64 and the other way around.

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Having 60 setup projects is just wrong. Start with one. The x64 installer is then just one more. – Hans Passant Nov 6 '11 at 17:43
    
I don't think it's wrong, it's necessary. I have different MSI's and master installer chooses which elements to install, depends on many parameters, such as user choice etc. Master installer is web forms project, because I can't run multiple MSI's. Need suggestions on given situation please. – eddyuk Nov 7 '11 at 7:15
    
Whoa 60 projects! What type of app is that? – Elmo Jan 12 '12 at 19:43

You shouldn't have to go through each project and change the project properties each time. Have you tried changing the active solution platform via Configuration Manager? That should change all projects in the solution.

You may also want to look into what the x86/x64/AnyCPU platform target does for you. Unless you have specific needs, AnyCPU will likely be the target that you want.

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