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How can I make the following work?

trait T {
  type I <: T
  def apply(i: I): I
}

class Foo[T0 <: T](t: T0) {
  def bar(x: T0) = t(x)
}
implicit def tofoo[T0 <: T](t: T0) = new Foo(t)

The bar line yields the error:

type mismatch; found : x.type (with underlying type T0) required: Foo.this.t.I

(One might argue why pimp and having bar doing the same as apply in T. But it´s because I reduced the problem. In my working code I have a Seq[T] as a parameter of bar.)

EDIT:

Due to the answer of @AlexeyRomanov I show an example (also reduced from working code) what also should work:

trait T {
  type I <: T
  def apply(i: I): I
}

class Foo[T0 <: T { type I = T0 }](val t: T0) {
  def bar(x: T0) = t(x)
  def test = "!"
}

implicit def tofoo[T0 <: T { type I = T0 }](t: T0) = new Foo(t)


trait TA extends T {
  type I = TA
}
case class TB() extends TA {
  def apply(i: I): I = i
}

println(TB().test) // ERROR: value test is not a member of TB
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

It doesn't work because it is not sound. Suppose it worked, then we could do this:

trait T {
  type I <: T
  def apply(i: I): I
}

class Foo[T0 <: T](t: T0) {
  def bar(x: T0) = t(x)
}

class TA extends T {
    type I = TB
    def apply(i: I): I = i
}

class TB extends T {
    type I = T
    def apply(i: I): I = i
}

val ta = new TA
val foo = new Foo(ta)
foo.bar(ta) // calls ta(ta)

But ta.apply expects an element of type TB, not TA!

So, basically, the code you wrote does not represent the type relationships you have in your mind.

share|improve this answer
class Foo[T0 <: T {type I = T0}](val t: T0) { 
  def bar(x: T0) = t(x) 
}

implicit def tofoo[T0 <: T {type I = T0}](t: T0) = new Foo(t)
share|improve this answer
    
I am confused right now: Am I right that your solution states T0.I = T0? But what if I should be a subtype of T as denoted in trait T? (Perhaps I haven´t set that clear in my question) Is it still possible? –  Peter Schmitz Nov 6 '11 at 15:18
    
Or even a supertype TA of T0 = TB as in my edit. –  Peter Schmitz Nov 6 '11 at 15:28
    
Then that's what you should require: T {type I >: T0} –  Alexey Romanov Nov 6 '11 at 16:49
    
If the only requirement is that I be a subtype of T then obviously it's not possible: that's why your original definition doesn't compile. Just consider definitions trait TA extends T and class TB() extends T { type I = TA; def apply(x: TA) = x}. What should new Foo[TB](new TB).bar(new TB) do? –  Alexey Romanov Nov 6 '11 at 16:56
    
I want to ensure that the parameter x of bar has the same underlying type I as t in Foo. So the types of some T for Foo and of some other T for the bar parameter can be different, but their underlying I has to be the same. E.g. two subclasses Tb and Tc of my above Ta have the same I but are different types while wrapping in Foo. –  Peter Schmitz Nov 6 '11 at 17:05

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