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I've found the question below in the CS GRE sample test but can't be sure if it's a) or e) Can anyone point out which one it is?

Thanks in advance

Which data structure would be most appropriate to implement a collection of values with the following three characteristics?

Items are retrieved and removed from the collection in FIFO order. There is no a priori limit on the number of items in the collection. The size of an item is large relative to the storage required for a memory address. A) Singly-linked list, with head and tail pointers B) Doubly-linked list, with only a head pointer C) Array D) Binary tree E) Hash table

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This should really be tagged homework - the array and hashtable tags are probably unnecessary. – Steve314 Nov 6 '11 at 16:19
up vote 3 down vote accepted
  1. Items are retrieved and removed from the collection in FIFO order.
  2. There is no a priori limit on the number of items in the collection.
  3. The size of an item is large relative to the storage required for a memory address.

Given requirements 1 and 2, I'd say a Singly-linked list, with head and tail pointers is your best bet. You can insert elements quickly with the tail pointer and remove them using the head pointer.

You can eliminate each of the other options based on one or more of the requirements.

Doubly-linked list, with only a head pointer - only having a head pointer makes it hard to implement the FIFO requirement.

Array - imposes an a priori limit on the size of the collection that other data structures do not.

Binary tree - doesn't organize the elements in a way that makes it convenient to implement FIFO.

Hash table - makes FIFO impossible.

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Agreed - you could use an array, but you'd really be implementing a circular queue with an array as an underlying building block. It has advantages, but listing "array" rather than "circular queue" in the multi-choice options would be odd. – Steve314 Nov 6 '11 at 16:21
    
On your edit (pedantic) - it's possible to grow circular queues beyond the original array size simply by reallocating the array and copying. If the array size grows by e.g. doubling, this has reasonable performance for many applications - amortized O(1) per insert/delete. NOT something for most beginners to worry about, though. – Steve314 Nov 6 '11 at 16:32
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the question says the data stored is large relative to a pointer size, so array would involve more copying on insertion, and would take up more space if the queue size is small. – Kevin Nov 6 '11 at 16:35

The answer is a queue that is implemented as a linked list, but since that isn't an option, answer A will have to do.

B. no tail pointer means removing from the queue will be O(n) which is worse than list with head and tail pointers.

C. Would implement FIFO but "size of an item is large relative to storage required for a memory address" is a dead give away that a linked list of some kind is expected.

D. maintains sort order but not insertion order so you won't be able to implement FIFO

E. would not be correct because hash tables do not maintain order.

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Pedanting : "Queue" is an abstract data type, not really a data structure. "Abstract Data Type" represents the set of values and operations. Details of how the set of values is implemented are ignored. So the set of values for a Queue ADT is a sequence of items - implementing the sequence as a linked list, an array or whatever is irrelevant to the ADT. While data structures are used to implement ADTs, they aren't really the same thing. Sometimes an ADT is named (without worrying about implementation) as a building block of a larger algorithm/data structure, though. – Steve314 Nov 6 '11 at 16:27
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Yes you are right, I guess queue is really a re-stating of the question, since queue and FIFO collection are the same. – Kevin Nov 6 '11 at 16:32
    
Couldn't you use a counter as the key and use a hashtable anyway? And you could use the binary tree as singly linked list without tail pointer, making deletion awkward but it would still work. (of course A remains the best answer) – harold Nov 6 '11 at 16:43
    
My previous comment of course assumes that the binary tree is not otherwise constrained (ie not a binary search tree) – harold Nov 6 '11 at 16:50
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Just because it's multiple choice is no excuse to spread misinformation – harold Nov 6 '11 at 19:59

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