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I think it's a spirit of C++ - you don't pay for what you don't want ( you explicitly pay for what you need ):

// a.h
#include <iosfwd>

template< class T >
class QVector;

struct A
{
void process( QVector<int> );

void print( std::ostream& );
};

// some.cpp

#include "a.h"

#include <iostream> // I need only A::print() in this module, not full interface

...
A().print( std::cout );
...

That's why I think that it's not fair to prohibit developer to work such way with STL ( Will C++11 STL have forward declaration's files? ).

But also I see one bad thing: dependencies of module A will spread out in external context ( duplication of #include directives ) and it can lead to hard refactoring when interface will change ( e.g. replace QVector with QList - and now you need to replace all occurrences of <QVector> with <QList> ).

Solution of this problem is:

#include <iostream>
#include <QVector>

struct A
{
void process( QVector<int> );

void print( std::ostream& );
};

Should we call this an idiom "fundamental types of interface" - module interface's types should be like fundamentals types ( are always defined and available )? It also makes sense, but still isn't clear what way is better ( e.g. Qt mixes both approaches ).

My personal decision - always provide both ways for better modularity ( when we have enough dependencies ):

// a_decl.h
#include <iosfwd>

template< class T >
class QVector;

struct A
{
void process( QVector<int> );

void print( std::ostream& );
};

// a.h
// Include this file if you want to use most interface methods
// and don't want to write a lot of `#include`
#include <iostream>
#include <QVector>

#include "a_decl.h"

and let developer chooses what to include.

What you can say about these approaches? What way is better for you and why? Do we have a one clear winner for all cases or it always will depend on context?

From my correspondence with language creator ( I didn't receive an final answer )

UPDATE:

With boost 1.48.0 comes Container library, which allow to define containers of undefined user types ( read more ).

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closed as not constructive by Mat, minitech, BЈовић, Bo Persson, Richard Nov 7 '11 at 8:50

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I'm very confused. Why are you talking about modules? –  Pubby Nov 6 '11 at 16:53
    
Yes, in C++ there is no such keyword, but modularity is common concept for all object oriented languages at the least. –  Iakov Minochkin Nov 6 '11 at 16:56

2 Answers 2

C++ is a language that leaves many degrees of freedom to the programmer, so it is somehow unavoidable that there are different ways to do the same thing.

IMO, what you define as "the solution", i.e., including in any .h file all the necessary includes or forward declarations, is the way to go in order to avoid "incomplete header files", and I have always followed this rule.

There is an interesting book with a thorough discussion of all the pros and cons of doing or not doing so: "Large-Scale C++ Software Design" by John Lakos, where the rule above comes from.

Speaking specifically about forward declarations, Lakos distinguishes between "in-name-only" and "in-size" class usages; only in the second case it is legitimate (according to his opinion) the use of a forward declaration:

Definition: A function f uses a type T in size if compiling the body of f requires having first seen the definition of T.

Definition: A function f uses a type T in name only if compiling f and any of the components on which f may depend does not require having first seen the definition of T.

(source)

Specifically, Lakos' reasoning revolves around the implications of certain styles of programming C++ for large scale systems, i.e. system of certain complexity, but I think that his suggestions are very well suited for any-scale systems also.

Hope that his helps.

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The "in size" terminology is terrible. You need the definition of an type in order to call its non-virtual members through a pointer, or to access its static members, but that has nothing whatsoever to do with the size of an object. –  Ben Voigt Dec 11 '11 at 16:17

I consider both as the right approach.

Creating a forward header is simple, and much the responsibility of the library maintainer.

The developer/client can then choose to use the forward header or the physical header based on his/her needs.

Large projects will certainly favor and benefit from forward headers where possible.

Including the physical headers does not really solve dependency issues, but introduces new dependencies in many cases. e.g. "If I remove #include <string> from this header, then some compilations will fail (and could vary by the library you are using and its platform differences).

I think a good library maintainer should provide forward headers because it is a pain for others to maintain any differences and updates, based on platform, version, etc. There is a clear winner when projects become suitably large - with both, you always have choice.

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