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I'm working through http://www.tutorialspoint.com/python/python_files_io.htm

and trying to follow through on the tutorial code:

>>> fo = open("foo.txt", "wb")
>>> fo.write("this");

However, I get the following error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<pyshell#3>", line 1, in <module>
fo.write("this");
TypeError: 'str' does not support the buffer interface

According to the tutorial, this should write the content "this" into the newly created file.

I'm guessing the syntax might have changed since the tutorial i'm using was written but I could use some help to point me in the right direction here, thanks.

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1  
downvoter, please explain reason for down voting. –  Srikar Appal Nov 6 '11 at 17:42
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What version of Python are you using. For me its fine in Python2.6.1

Python 2.6.1 (r261:67515, Jun 24 2010, 21:47:49) 
[GCC 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5646)] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> fo = open("foo.txt", "wb")
>>> fo.write("this");
>>> fo.close()
>>> 
>>> fo = open("foo.txt")
>>> fo.read()
'this'
>>> 

Are you using Python3.X? If you are using Python3x then string is not the same type as for Python 2.x, you must cast it to bytes (encode it).

fo.write(bytes("this", 'UTF-8'))

When you are reading it from this file -

fo = open("foo.txt", "rb")
s2 = fo.read().decode('UTF-8')
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Python 3.2.2, I think we are close to solving the problem! thanks for trying it out for me –  Michael Nov 6 '11 at 17:35
    
How do I go about casting a string to bytes? –  Michael Nov 6 '11 at 17:37
1  
check out my updated answer. I feel that should solve it. –  Srikar Appal Nov 6 '11 at 17:37
1  
@Michael Either .encode('utf-8') # or some other encoding or if it's a string literal, b'this'. –  agf Nov 6 '11 at 17:38
    
@Srikar See stackoverflow.com/questions/7585435/…, it's usual / more Pythonic to use the method I mentioned in my comment. –  agf Nov 6 '11 at 17:39
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