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I am implementing a 2-player game that will be run in a tight loop literally hundreds of thousands of times, being then performance paramount.

My code actually looks something like this:

public class Table {
    private final int WHITE_PLAYER = +1;
    private final int BLACK_PLAYER = -1;

    private final int currentPlayer;
    private final int otherPlayer;

    ...
}

I was wondering if I would get any performance hit would I choose to replace

private final int WHITE_PLAYER = +1;
private final int BLACK_PLAYER = -1;

to an enum defined as

public enum Players {
    WhitePlayer,
    BlackPlayer
}

I had the idea that enums were just syntactic sugar over integer constants, and taking a glaze look over the bytecode generated for a test enum, as well as the code calling it, seems to indicate that using them is indeed the same as making a static method call but for some enum infrastructure that is set up when it's first run.

Is my assumption that it is indeed the same to use enums as static constants correct or am I missing something here?

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hundred of thousands of times per what time unit? –  forty-two Nov 6 '11 at 17:58
    
good question. i'll run the games 24/7 for (I estimate) some days, so the faster they end, the sooner I get to analyse their results. i beg people to not turn this into the typical war against performance tuning thread.. –  devoured elysium Nov 6 '11 at 17:59
4  
If it thought it really mettered, I would measure it. –  forty-two Nov 6 '11 at 18:10
    
Without you telling us WHAT you're even doing with the enums we can't answer that question even if we wanted. –  Voo Nov 6 '11 at 22:23
    
@devouredelysium I don't think there is a war against performance tuning. Most people just advise against premature optimization. See my (heavily downvoted) answer on how much slower the enum comparison is (~ 1.5%). –  Ingo Kegel Nov 7 '11 at 8:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In a micro-benchmark, yes, checking integer constant equality will be faster than checking enum constant equality.

However, in a real application, let alone a game, this will be totally irrelevant. The things that are happening in the AWT subsystem (or any other GUI toolkit) dwarf these micro-performance considerations by many orders of magnitude.

EDIT

Let me elaborate a little then.

An enum comparison goes like this:

aload_0
getstatic
if_acmpne

An integer comparison for a small integer goes like this:

iload_0
iconst_1
if_icmpne

Obviously, the first is more work than the second, although the difference is quite small.

Run the following test case:

class Test {

    static final int ONE = 1;
    static final int TWO = 2;

    enum TestEnum {ONE, TWO}

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        testEnum();
        testInteger();
        time("enum", new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                testEnum();

            }
        });
        time("integer", new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                testInteger();
            }
        });
    }

    private static void testEnum() {
        TestEnum value = TestEnum.ONE;
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++) {
            if (value == TestEnum.TWO) {
                System.err.println("impossible");
            }
        }
    }

    private static void testInteger() {
        int value = ONE;
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++) {
            if (value == TWO) {
                System.err.println("impossible");
            }
        }
    }

    private static void time(String name, Runnable runnable) {
        long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        runnable.run();
        System.err.println(name + ": " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - startTime) + " ms");
    }
}

and you will find that the enum comparison is slower that the integer comparison, on my machine by around 1.5%.

All I was saying is that this difference will not matter in a real application ("Premature optimization is the root of all evil"). I deal with performance problems on a professional basis (see my profile) and I have never seen a hot spot that could be traced to something like this.

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"However, in an real application, let alone a game, this will be totally irrelevant. The things that are happening in the AWT subsystem (or any other GUI toolkit) dwarf these micro-performance considerations by many orders of magnitude." so you are assuming there is indeed, a GUI for this game? totally false! –  devoured elysium Nov 6 '11 at 18:01
1  
Why would it be faster to compare a 32-bit reference (Enum identity equality) with a 32-bit integer? (Obviously you wouldn't use the .equals method) –  Kirk Woll Nov 6 '11 at 18:04
    
Answer is incorrect, downvote. –  EJP Nov 6 '11 at 22:09
1  
@all see my edit –  Ingo Kegel Nov 7 '11 at 8:33
    
@Ingo, I didn't downvote -- mine was just a question. But I appreciate your thorough response to my query. +1 –  Kirk Woll Nov 7 '11 at 18:08

JIT will optimize a lot of things making things like this irrelevant after it's been running for a while

not to mention enums are more readable and more foolproof should you make an error in your code

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Will optimize things like what? –  EJP Nov 6 '11 at 22:08

You should care about having nice and readable code before you care about performance. Until your profiling results (no guessing!) show that enums are the bottleneck, forget about performance and use whatever is easier to understand.

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Nice one! Not answering the question! –  devoured elysium Nov 6 '11 at 18:02
    
This answers your question, you just don't understand or don't like the answer. Well, that's your choice. –  unbeli Nov 6 '11 at 18:15
    
it absolutely is the right answer. You won't be able to tell the difference between using ints and using enums. –  MeBigFatGuy Nov 6 '11 at 20:02

Your assumption is correct. Java makes sure there is only ever one instance of the enum so that == is as efficient as comparing ints.

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Answer is incorrect, downvote. –  Ingo Kegel Nov 7 '11 at 9:29
    
@IngoKegel Incorrect in what particular exactly? –  EJP Nov 7 '11 at 9:30
    
see the edit to my answer –  Ingo Kegel Nov 7 '11 at 9:30
    
@IngoKegel You haven't answered the question. In what respect is my answer incorrect? –  EJP Nov 7 '11 at 9:32
    
"== is as efficient as comparing ints" –  Ingo Kegel Nov 7 '11 at 9:34

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