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The Mac App Store guidelines say you can't use private APIs.

I'm toying with an app that modifies a Finder setting using a terminal command setting showAllFiles to true:

defaults write com.apple.Finder AppleShowAllFiles TRUE

Is there any way to be able to submit something like this into the Mac App Store? It seems like a private API to me. My question is: is there a public equivalent?

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2 Answers 2

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I think it would depend on how you execute this command. What C/ObjC APIs are you using to execute this? There are certainly public APIs which could be used to execute this command.

However, an important thing to keep in mind is that Apple will require apps submitted to the Mac App Store to adopt their "Sandboxing" scheme starting in March 2012. Docs here:

http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Security/Conceptual/AppSandboxDesignGuide/AboutAppSandbox/AboutAppSandbox.html

I suspect that executing this command (even through public APIs) in a Sandboxed app will require that you declare the need for a special entitlement. More details on Entitlements here:

http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Miscellaneous/Reference/EntitlementKeyReference/Introduction/AboutEntitlements.html%23//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40011195

Specifically, I think you might need this "temporary entitlement":

com.apple.security.temporary-exception.files.home-relative-path.read-write

as I believe writing user defaults of an app like Finder would entail writing to a file on disk under the user's home dir:

~/Library/Preferences/com.apple.finder.plist
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I just found this thread: devforums.apple.com/message/514928#514928, so I'm not sure the App store would even approve such an entitlement - thanks though! –  user1017624 Nov 6 '11 at 19:20
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I would also keep in mind the fact that humans at Apple will review your app. If your app alters the preferences of another app (especially an essential one from Apple like Finder), while not necessarily verboten, it will likely draw their attention and may lead to rejection. –  Todd Ditchendorf Nov 6 '11 at 19:22

I assume you tried to use NSUserDefaults and found it has no real capacity to alter settings for other applications. Fortunately for you, the CFPreferences API exists for this sort of purpose and can modify settings under any bundle identifier.

That said, the actual settings of other applications are implementation details private to those applications; even though you're not using a tool/API that's undocumented, you're making changes to another process, and that may fall afoul of the App Store rules.

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Except that NSUserDefaults can be used to read and modify settings of other applications. CF does have a cleaner API IMO, though. –  Bavarious Nov 6 '11 at 21:02
    
It can be used that way in a broad sense, yes, but it's not designed for it. CFPreferences is. –  Jonathan Grynspan Nov 6 '11 at 21:56

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