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I ran into a very weird problem today. Long story short, my function returns one value, the caller gets a different value. Somewhere around my code I have a call to:

Message* m = NULL;
m = connection_receive(c);

Where connection_receive is defined as follows:

Message* connection_receive(Connection* c)
{
Message* k;

    if (c->state == CON_STATE_AUTHENTICATED)
    {
        pthread_mutex_lock(&c->mutex_in);

        if (g_queue_is_empty(c->in))
            k = NULL;
        else
            k = (Message*)g_queue_pop_head(c->in);

        pthread_mutex_unlock(&c->mutex_in);
        /* Until here, k is reachable and contains the correct data. */
        return k;
    }
    else
        return NULL; 
}

Here's a gdb run, I stopped right before the return and right after the assignment:

222         return k;
(gdb) p k
$1 = (Message *) 0x7ffff0000950
(gdb) n
226 }
(gdb) n
main () at src/main.c:57
57              if (m)
(gdb) p m
$2 = (Message *) 0xfffffffff0000950

Of course, if we try to access 0xfffffffff0000950 we'll get a segmentation fault.

If I change the function and instead of returning a value, using a second parameter to pass the value it works, but I would like to know what went wrong on this one.

Thank you very much.

EDIT: This works, but it's not convenient. And I would also like to know why such strange error is happening.

void connection_receive2(Connection* c, Message** m)
{
    if (c->state == CON_STATE_AUTHENTICATED)
    {
        pthread_mutex_lock(&c->mutex_in);

        if (g_queue_is_empty(c->in))
            *m = NULL;
        else
            *m = (Message*)g_queue_pop_head(c->in);

        pthread_mutex_unlock(&c->mutex_in);
    }
    else
        *m = NULL;
}

EDIT2: Solved. Thanks all. The problem was a typo on the header file. I can't use -Werror because I need to do things which raise some warnings, and in a large make output and large header I missed it.

share|improve this question
    
I had that happen once. fin showed one return value and the variable it was stored into showed another. A recompile fixed it for me (didn't even change the source at all); best I can guess is a dependent object file didn't get recompiled, otherwise possibly a (rarely encountered) bug in gcc. –  Kevin Nov 6 '11 at 18:48
    
You need to boil this down to a SSCCE that demonstrates the problem and post it - there's nothing wrong with the code you've posted; the problem lies elsewhere. –  Brian Roach Nov 6 '11 at 18:52
    
@BrianRoach, I'll see what I can do. It's kind of a big project. –  Victor Nov 6 '11 at 22:41
2  
You might see this behavior if there is a missing prototype for connection_receive() where you call connection_receive() (as the return value will be converted a signed int and back to a pointer again, since the compiler will assume the function to return an int) –  nos Nov 6 '11 at 22:52
    
@nos That was it. I edited the question. Thanks. –  Victor Nov 6 '11 at 23:09
show 2 more comments

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
  1. How is your m defined?
  2. Has your caller access to the right prototype?
  3. What architecture are you on?

I suspect that there is a mismatch with the types and that my question 2 is the crux of all.

You are returning a pointer with (I suppose so) 48 or 64 bits. The caller, however, thinks to get a int, which has maybe 32 bits and is signed. On converting back to a pointer, the value gets sign-extended.

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4  
+1, I'm pretty sure (2) is correct. This is the reason you should always develop with the maximum compile warnings set (-Wall -Werror on gcc), since it'll catch this sort of thing. –  therefromhere Nov 6 '11 at 19:06
    
yes, the lower half of the return value being exactly the same is very suspicious. –  Jens Gustedt Nov 6 '11 at 19:19
    
@therefromhere I'm sorry, I forgot to say. My "m" is also a Message*. Yes, the caller has access to the same prototype, I'm in fact testing the module. Neither -Wall nor -Wextra give me anything, it's compiling like a charm. I'm building and runing it on a Fedora 15, 2.6.40.6-0 64bits –  Victor Nov 6 '11 at 22:47
1  
Bull's eye. Thanks. After reading your comment I decided to recheck the header file, there was a typo on the definition. –  Victor Nov 6 '11 at 23:05
    
So module testing again proved to be very helpful :-) –  glglgl Nov 7 '11 at 0:27
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Did you push a malloc:ed object on the queue? If not and you instead pushed a stack object then when you may end up with weird behavior when you pop items.

share|improve this answer
    
It's a malloc'ed object. I edited the original post, and posted a equivalent definition that works fine. It's really strange! –  Victor Nov 6 '11 at 22:49
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