Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In c++, any variables declared in main will be available throughout main right? I mean if the variables were declared in a try loop, will they would still be accessible throughout main? Because I have declared several variables in a try loop in main, but if I use them in any other part of main outside the try loop, I get a "was not declared in this scope" error

I unfortunately can't post my actual code but this is basically what I am doing

int main()
{
   try 
   {
     int number = 0;
   }

   catch (...)
   {
     cout <<"Error";
   }

   number ++;
   cout <<number;

   return 0;
}

I would basically get an error on line 13 and 14 saying number wasn't declared in this scope.

share|improve this question
3  
The answer should be clear from the compile error message, no? ☕ –  Matt Ball Nov 6 '11 at 21:06
    
Do you have any compile error when you put int number = 0; out of try{} ? –  M M. Nov 6 '11 at 21:12

4 Answers 4

The scope of number is limited to the try block. Pull out this declaration to the main scope to access the variable after the try block:

int main()
{
   int number = 0;
   try 
   {
     // do something...
   }

   catch (...)
   {
     cout <<"Error";
   }

   number ++;
   cout <<number;

   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but I need the variables to be accessible throughout main and by in a try block - how would i do this? I don't want to make the variables global, because I don't want access to by other functions. –  user1017485 Nov 6 '11 at 21:08
    
@user1017485: it's not global here, it's still within main, but outside the try block. –  Matthieu M. Nov 6 '11 at 21:12
    
number is already available inside try block and all rest of main that follows the declaration of number (i.e. int number = 0;). –  Xion Nov 6 '11 at 21:12
    
@user1017485: What Xion is doing doesn't make it global, his re-write of your function makes the number only usable in main. –  Bair Nov 6 '11 at 21:12
1  
@user1017485: Your question doesn't state that declaring your variable allocates memory, and your simplified example eliminates this key point. This is why it's important to post actual code that you're using, instead of an abbreviated example. –  Greg Hewgill Nov 6 '11 at 21:25

Local variables in C++ have block scope, not function scope. The variable number is only in scope inside the try block.

To make this work, you have (at least) two choices:

  1. Make the variable accessible at function scope (not so good):

    int main() {
        int number;
        try {
            number = <some possibly-exception-throwing call>;
        } catch (...) {
            cout << "Error\n";
            return 0;
        }
        ++number;
        cout << number;
    }
    
  2. Place all use of the variable inside the try scope (much better):

    int main() {
        try {
            int number = <some possibly-exception-throwing call>;
            ++number;
            cout << number;
        } catch (...) {
            cout << "Error\n";
        }
    }
    

I strongly favour the second choice, for a few reasons:

  1. You don't have to explicitly handle the case that the variable wasn't initialised correctly.
  2. There's no risk of accidentally using the uninitialised variable. In fact, your code would exhibit precisely this bug if C++ locals had function scope (assuming the intent was to initialise number with something more interesting than a constant).
  3. It keeps declaration and initialisation together.

Appendix: For main() in particular, there's a third choice:

    int main() try {
        ...
    } catch {
        cout << "Error\n";
    }

This wraps the entire program, including static initialisers outside of main() proper, in a try...catch.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but I need the variables to be accessible throughout main and by in a try block - how would i do this? I don't want to make the variables global, because I don't want access to by other functions. –  user1017485 Nov 6 '11 at 21:08
    
I'd say this is a real good answer, from what I understood from the rest of the comments this accomplishes what the poster wants. Even if he doesn't seem to get it himself. Otherwise I would have asked if it was possible to separate declaration from initialization since it was suggested that it was a pointer variable. –  r_ahlskog Nov 6 '11 at 22:18

In c++, any variables declared in main will be available throughout main right?

No!

The scope of every variable is the block where the variable defined and its nested blocks : {}

You must put int number; outside the try{} block.


More on here:

Scope of variables All the variables that we intend to use in a program must have been declared with its type specifier in an earlier point in the code, like we did in the previous code at the beginning of the body of the function main when we declared that a, b, and result were of type int.

A variable can be either of global or local scope. A global variable is a variable declared in the main body of the source code, outside all functions, while a local variable is one declared within the body of a function or a block.

enter image description here

Global variables can be referred from anywhere in the code, even inside functions, whenever it is after its declaration.

The scope of local variables is limited to the block enclosed in braces ({}) where they are declared. For example, if they are declared at the beginning of the body of a function (like in function main) their scope is between its declaration point and the end of that function. In the example above, this means that if another function existed in addition to main, the local variables declared in main could not be accessed from the other function and vice versa.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but I need the variables to be accessible throughout main and by in a try block - how would i do this? I don't want to make the variables global, because I don't want access to by other functions. –  user1017485 Nov 6 '11 at 21:08
    
Put it outside of try{} after int main(){. –  M M. Nov 6 '11 at 21:10

That's normal; each { ... } block mark a new scope, and variables declared inside it are local to it. If you want number to be available throughout all main declare it outside the try block.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but I need the variables to be accessible throughout main and by in a try block - how would i do this? I don't want to make the variables global, because I don't want access to by other functions. –  user1017485 Nov 6 '11 at 21:08
    
Declare it at main level, it will be visible also inside the try block. In C++ variables declared at outer scopes are visible at inner scopes (unless they are shadowed by "more local" variables with the same name). –  Matteo Italia Nov 6 '11 at 21:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.