Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Javascript I have 2 questions:

  1. I am trying to create a prototype/class that inherits from the object that is returned by a specific function. But I dont know what that object's name is?

For the object: var xml = XMLHttpRequest(); what object is returned when I perform the function xml.responseXML;? Is it XMLDocument()? Or maybe XMLDOM()? Also if I create the object var xml = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLDOM"); and call var res = xmlHttp.load( "xmlFile.xml" ); does it return the same type of object as xml.responseXML;?

I am trying to do the following:

function XMLHandler()
{
   this.xmlFile = "defaultXML.xml";
}

// Make XMLHandler inherit from Javascript object
XMLHandler.prototype = new XMLDocument();
XMLHandler.prototype.constructor = XMLDocument;  

Next Question: I would like to declare a public function within a prototype/class. Which of the 3 ways is the correct way to declare a public function within a class? Which is better practice?

function myClass()
{
   myClass.prototype.publicFunct = function()
   {
      alert("public function");
   }
}

// other method
function myClass()
{
   publicFunct:function()
   {
      alert("public function");
   }
}

// other method
function myClass()
{
}

myClass.prototype.publicFunct = function()
{
   alert("public function");
}
share|improve this question
3  
SO is a Q&A site, not a forum. Separate questions should be, well, separate. –  outis Nov 6 '11 at 23:28
    
Please remove your second question and repost it as a real second question by Ask Question button on right top. –  BalusC Nov 7 '11 at 0:01

2 Answers 2

You shouldn't include unrelated questions in the same post. To address your second question about declaring a function within a "class":

Your first syntax, declaring it within the constructor, will pointlessesly overwrite myClass.prototype.publicFunct to point to a newly created function every time the constructor is called. That is, you will be creating an extra copy of the function with each call to the constructor, with myClass.prototype.publicFunct always pointing to the most recently created copy - or undefined until the constructor has been called at least once. Don't do this.

Your second option is simply invalid syntax in JavaScript.

Your third syntax is prefered. This will add the function to the prototype once.

Remember: JavaScript doesn't have classes as such, though you can sort of simulate them if you think it is worth the bother.

share|improve this answer

I can tell by your recent questions that you are thinking like Java, which this is not.

First question:
responseXML is different for each browser. Firefox gives a nsIDOMDocument, IE gives an IXMLDOMDocument and Webkit browsers depend on the responseType setting but will probably be Document. Since you cannot predict what it will be stop trying to extend it. In most cases the type isn't made available by the browser's API so javascript cannot extend it anyway.

Moreover, since JavaScript's inheritance is not class based you are forced into doing this:

XMLHandler.prototype = new XMLDocument();

...which simply does not work for your purpose. Any instance of XMLHandler will be built on an unrelated, empty document and not the document returned by responseXML. You have to use a wrapper here.


Second Question:
Of your 3 methods the first is equivalent to the last but more wasteful because it repeatedly sets the same function to the same prototype. The second is nonsensical, the syntax is broken. These are your real options:

// Instance method, every instance is given a copy of the function upon "new"
function MyClass()
{
    this.publicFunct = function()
    {
        alert("public function");
    };
}

// Prototypal method, only one copy of the function shared by all instances
function MyClass()
{
}

MyClass.prototype.publicFunct = function()
{
    alert("public function");
};

// Shorthand method, same as prototypal but handy for several members at once
// It prevents MyClass from being a descendent of another type
function MyClass()
{
}

MyClass.prototype = {
    // A colon is only acceptable in object notation
    publicFunct: function()
    {
        alert("public function");
    }
};

I would go with a prototypal method for efficiency unless you need to selectively add functions to a class. Your use of "public function" (also "class") seems like another symptom of an OOP background, there aren't any private functions in JavaScript so "public" has no place, all member functions are public. If at some point you do need a private function you can fake the effect with a closure.

(function() {

    // Assignments are mostly global
    MyClass = function() {};

    MyClass.prototype.publicFunct = function()
    {
        privateFunct();
    };

    // These statements affect local scope
    var foo = 'bar';

    function privateFunct()
    {
        alert("public function");
    }

})(); // These extra brackets cause the contents to be executed immediately

Having said that it is rare to need private functions and all JavaScript is visible anyway so it's not secret really. The above could be thwarted like this:

thief = {};
MyClass.prototype.publicFunct.call(thief);
// privateFunct is called by publicFunct in the context of the thief

You might as well accept that functions are public. You can go a step further and give up on classes altogether. Objects are just objects that happen to have some functions and those functions can even be shared with completely different objects.

share|improve this answer
    
"the first is equivalent to the last but more wasteful because it repeatedly sets the same function to the same prototype" - it's even more wasteful than that because it's not the same function: it repeatedly creates a new function and assigns it. In your last example about thwarting private functions, the private function is still private - you can't call it directly. –  nnnnnn Nov 7 '11 at 1:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.