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so my current version looks like this: Animation Movie

i'm fairly new to core-animations, so what i try to achieve is that there are multiple points like the current one, moving from the left box in various angles, heights and speeds out of it, just like a tennis ball machine.

enter image description here

the first problem is, that my "ball" doesn't look like it gets grabbed from gravity and also the speed at first is not fast enough.

also, how to do this animation multiple times with variating distances between the beginning.

if something is unclear, PLEASE leave a comment.

my current code:

- (void)loadView {
    [super loadView];

    self.view.backgroundColor = [UIColor lightGrayColor];   

    CGPoint startPoint = CGPointMake(20, 300);
    CGPoint endPoint = CGPointMake(300, 500);

    UIBezierPath *trackPath = [UIBezierPath bezierPath];
    [trackPath moveToPoint:startPoint];
    [trackPath addQuadCurveToPoint:endPoint controlPoint:CGPointMake(endPoint.x, startPoint.y)];

    CALayer *point = [CALayer layer];
    point.bounds = CGRectMake(0, 0, 20.0, 20.0);
    point.position = startPoint;
    point.contents = (id)([UIImage imageNamed:@"point.png"].CGImage);
    [self.view.layer addSublayer:point];

    CAKeyframeAnimation *anim = [CAKeyframeAnimation animationWithKeyPath:@"position"];
    anim.path = trackPath.CGPath;
    anim.timingFunction = [CAMediaTimingFunction functionWithName:kCAMediaTimingFunctionEaseOut];
    anim.repeatCount = HUGE_VALF;
    anim.duration = 2.0;
    [point addAnimation:anim forKey:@"movepoint"];

    CALayer *caseLayer = [CALayer layer];
    caseLayer.bounds = CGRectMake(0, 0, 140.0, 150.0);
    caseLayer.position = startPoint;
    caseLayer.contents = (id)([UIImage imageNamed:@"case.png"].CGImage);
    [self.view.layer addSublayer:caseLayer];

}
share|improve this question
2  
I'd suggest that you look at using cocos2d/box2d to run your "animation" as a physics simulation. That's what it sounds like it's supposed to be, if you want realistic gravity and particle movements. – aroth Nov 6 '11 at 23:53
    
i think i don't need such a dependency. it's only for one single (and not very important) view in my application. – choise Nov 7 '11 at 6:04
    
Since you're trying to incorporate basic physics to the ball, would using CADisplayLink and animating the ball be repeatedly changing its position be acceptable? Does anyone have anything against this solution? – aleph_null Nov 15 '11 at 22:17
up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

Easiest way to model gravity is with those parabolic equations that you learn in basic physics. In short, the function below takes an initial position, a speed, and an angle (IN RADIANS, where 0 is to the right). a CALayer appears at position and gets shot at that speed and angle.

I'm using a CADisplayLink (which is effectively a timer that synchronizes with your frame rate) to call a function very quickly. Every time the function is called, the point is moved. The horizontal speed is constant and the vertical speed increases towards the bottom every frame to emulate gravity (`vy -= 0.5f; ). If you want more/less gravity, just mess around with this 0.5f value.

- (id)initWithFrame:(CGRect)frame {

    self = [super initWithFrame:frame];
    if (self) {
      point = [[CALayer alloc] init];
      point.bounds = CGRectMake(0.0f, 0.0f, 10.0f, 10.0f);
      point.backgroundColor = [UIColor redColor].CGColor;
      point.position = CGPointMake(-10.0f, -10.0f);
      [self.layer addSublayer:point];
      [point release];
    }
    return self;
}

-(void)animateBallFrom:(CGPoint)start withSpeed:(CGFloat)speed andAngle:(CGFloat)angle       
  vx = speed*cos(angle);
  vy = speed*sin(angle);


  [CATransaction begin];
  [CATransaction setDisableActions:YES];
  point.position = start;
  [CATransaction commit];

  displayLink = [CADisplayLink displayLinkWithTarget:self selector:@selector(animate)];
  [displayLink setFrameInterval:2];
  [displayLink addToRunLoop:[NSRunLoop currentRunLoop] forMode:NSRunLoopCommonModes];
}

-(void)animate {
  if (point.position.x + point.bounds.size.width/2.0f < 0.0f || point.position.x > self.bounds.size.width + point.bounds.size.width/2.0f ||
    point.position.y + point.bounds.size.height/2.0f < 0.0f || point.position.y > self.bounds.size.height + point.bounds.size.height/2.0f) {
    [displayLink invalidate];
  } else {
    [CATransaction begin];
    [CATransaction setDisableActions:YES];
    point.position = CGPointMake(point.position.x+vx, point.position.y-vy);
    vy -= 0.5f;
    [CATransaction commit];
  }
}

and the interface:

@interface Bounce : UIView {
  CALayer *point;
  CADisplayLink *displayLink;
  CGFloat vx, vy;
}

-(void)animateBallFrom:(CGPoint)start withSpeed:(CGFloat)speed andAngle:(CGFloat)angle;

@end
share|improve this answer

I think there may be a couple of things you can do here.
- One is to use kCAMediaTimingFunctionLinear instead of kCAMediaTimingFunctionEaseOut.
- The other is to set your control point in the center of the ball's fall, wherever that may be. Try this:

CGPoint startPoint = CGPointMake(20, 300);
CGPoint controlPoint = CGPointMake(160, 400);
CGPoint endPoint = CGPointMake(300, 500);

UIBezierPath *trackPath = [UIBezierPath bezierPath];
[trackPath moveToPoint:startPoint];
[trackPath addQuadCurveToPoint:endPoint controlPoint:controlPoint];

CALayer *point = [CALayer layer];
point.bounds = CGRectMake(0, 0, 20.0, 20.0);
point.position = startPoint;
point.contents = (id)([UIImage imageNamed:@"point.png"].CGImage);
[self.view.layer addSublayer:point];

CAKeyframeAnimation *anim = [CAKeyframeAnimation animationWithKeyPath:@"position"];
anim.path = trackPath.CGPath;
anim.timingFunction = [CAMediaTimingFunction functionWithName:kCAMediaTimingFunctionLinear];
anim.repeatCount = HUGE_VALF;
anim.duration = 2.0;
[point addAnimation:anim forKey:@"movepoint"];

You should then be able to move the control point around for different paths.

share|improve this answer
    
this creates a straight line – choise Nov 10 '11 at 16:42
    
Exactly! So what you should do is play around with the control point variable to get curves. For example, move the x value out to, say 200, for a curve. – Andrew Zimmer Nov 10 '11 at 22:21

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