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For example I'd like to have this to work the way to set jDName to "John Doe" and jDAge to 32:

case class Person(name : String, surname : String, age : Int)

val johnDoe = Person("John", "Doe", 32)

val jDName : String = johnDoe

val jDAge : Int = johnDoe

Can I write functions in the Person class to provide implicit conversion to String, Int and other (custom) types? And another thing is for explicit cast operation - also interesting, but I don't know exactly how should I write this for an example in Scala.

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2  
You can, but it's a really bad idea. You have two different strings which are not distinguished by type. If one gets converted implicitly and the other doesn't, that'd get awfully confusing. –  Rex Kerr Nov 6 '11 at 23:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Sure, put them in the companion object.

scala> case class Person(name : String, surname : String, age : Int); object Person {
     |   implicit def pToString(p: Person) = p.name + " " + p.surname + ", age " + p.age
     |   implicit def pToInt(p: Person) = p.age
     | }
defined class Person
defined module Person

scala> val johnDoe = Person("John", "Doe", 32)
johnDoe: Person = Person(John,Doe,32)

scala> val jDName : String = johnDoe
jDName: String = John Doe, age 32

scala> val jDAge : Int = johnDoe
jDAge: Int = 32
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Would this work?

object Person {
  implicit def pToString(p: Person) = p.name + " " + p.surname + ", age " + p.age
  implicit def pToInt(p: Person) = p.age
}
import Person._
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It'd probably work, but I was curious if it could be done in the class itself (as in C#, for example). –  Ivan Nov 6 '11 at 23:27
2  
@Ivan you can't put them in the class itself, as nothing there can be "static", everything in a class is scoped to the instance. What you want is something in a more generic scope. In the example case above this is the companion object Person and therefore in scope when dealing with the instance class Person. –  Jed Wesley-Smith Nov 7 '11 at 0:35
1  
Sorry, Ivan, but why did you mark Daniel's response as the answer and not mine. They're exactly the same and mine was first. Oh well! =) –  pr1001 Nov 7 '11 at 17:46

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