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Given:

template <typename T>
class C {
    C & operator ++ () { ... }
};

Why/how is C allowed to declare variables and functions of type C rather than being required to name C<T>? I had not really thought about it before working on a template with many parameters that would make spelling out the "self type" inconvenient.

Are there any quirks of this I should know about?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

[n3290: 14.6.1/1]: Like normal (non-template) classes, class templates have an injected-class-name (Clause 9). The injected-class-name can be used as a template-name or a type-name. When it is used with a template-argument-list, as a template-argument for a template template-parameter, or as the final identifier in the elaborated-type-specifier of a friend class template declaration, it refers to the class template itself. Otherwise, it is equivalent to the template-name followed by the template-parameters of the class template enclosed in <>.

Ostensibly, it's merely a convenience feature.

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3  
Amazing that two people upvoted this whilst I'd quoted the wrong passage ;-) The power of quoting the standard -- any part of the standard, evidently -- cannot be denied! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 7 '11 at 1:30
    
Aha, the concept I was missing was injected-class-name. Thanks! –  Ben Jackson Nov 7 '11 at 1:37
    
@BenJackson: No problem! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 7 '11 at 1:41
    
in c++11 , class name is not injected , so this will cause error i think –  Mr.Anubis Nov 8 '11 at 15:46
    
@Mr.Anubis: The above quote is from C++11, and it says "class templates have an injected-class-name". This testcase is not a total proof in that I don't trust implementations to "fully" follow the C++11 language rules yet, but I think it's certainly good enough. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 8 '11 at 16:21

It's just syntactic sugar.

It is convenient to not have to change the signatures of your methods if you have to change the template parameters.

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Why/how is C allowed to declare variables and functions of type C rather than being required to name C?

It's just specified like this. The name of the template is injected in its body and means the actual type (with arguments).

Are there any quirks of this I should know about?

Nothing serious. You just have to remember this doesn't work for base classes, so to do CRTP, you have to do

template <class T>
class A : public Base<A<T> > // not Base<A>
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2  
Except if Base expects a template template parameter. ;) –  Xeo Nov 7 '11 at 1:29
    
@Xeo: yes, but in CRTP, the base class expect the derived type. –  jpalecek Nov 7 '11 at 1:36
    
One does not exclude the other. –  Xeo Nov 7 '11 at 1:59

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