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I'm trying to insert a null value into my database from C# like this:

SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("INSERT INTO Employee
VALUES ('" + employeeID.Text + "','" + name.Text + "','" + age.Text
        + "','" + phone.Text + "','" + DBNull.Value + "')", connection);

DBNull.Value is where a date can be but I would like it to be equal to null but it seems to put in a default date, 1900 something...

share|improve this question
2  
Never generate an SQL query like that, use command parameters instead. Otherwise somebody will enter an employee with the name "); DELETE * FROM EMPLOYEE; -- " – Andrew Shepherd Nov 7 '11 at 2:10
    
This does seem to allow SQLi. You are aware of the implications? – Erwin Brandstetter Nov 7 '11 at 2:15
    
Thanks for the heads up – Steve Nov 7 '11 at 2:16
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Change to:

SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("INSERT INTO Employee VALUES ('" + employeeID.Text + "','" + name.Text + "','" + age.Text + "','" + phone.Text + "',null)", connection);

DBNull.Value.ToString() returns empty string, but you want null instead.

However this way of building your query can lead to issues. For example if one of your strings contain a quote ' the resulting query will throw error. A better way is to use parameters and set on the SqlCommand object:

SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("INSERT INTO Employee VALUES (@empId,@name,@age,@phone,null)", connection);
command.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@empId", employeeId.Text));
command.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@name", name.Text));
command.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@age", age.Text));
command.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@phone", phone.Text));
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much :) – Steve Nov 7 '11 at 2:12

Use Parameters.

SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("INSERT INTO Employee VALUES 
            (@employeeID,@name,@age,@phone,@bdate)",connection);
....
command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@bdate",DBNull.Value);
//or
command.Parameters.Add("@bdate",System.Data.SqlDbType.DateTime).Value=DBNull.Value;

Or try this,

 SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("INSERT INTO Employee 
         (employeeID,name,age,phone) VALUES 
                (@employeeID,@name,@age,@phone)",connection);
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1  
+1 for good practice – rick schott Nov 7 '11 at 2:13

Change DBNull.Value to the literal null for dynamic SQL:

SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("INSERT INTO Employee VALUES ('" + employeeID.Text + "','" + name.Text + "','" + age.Text + "','" + phone.Text + "',null)", connection);
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Try this:

SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand();
command.ComandText = "insert into employee values(@employeeId, @name, @age, @phone, @someNullVal)";
command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@employeedId", employeedID.Text);
// all your other parameters
command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@someNullVal", DBNull.Value);

This solves two problems. You explicit problem (with inserting a NULL value into the table), and SQL Injection potential.

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if you output "'" + DBNull.Value + "'" , you will find that it's '' , which means you insert an empty string instead of null into the DB. So, you just write null:

SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("INSERT INTO Employee
VALUES ('" + employeeID.Text + "','" + name.Text + "','" + age.Text
        + "','" + phone.Text + "', null)", connection);
share|improve this answer

try it like this.

SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("INSERT INTO Employee VALUES ('" + employeeID.Text + 
         "','" + name.Text + "','" + age.Text + "','" + phone.Text + "','Null')", connection);
share|improve this answer
    
It seems like you have Null in single quotes : 'Null' which will I think will put the string "Null" into the field. – akatakritos Nov 7 '11 at 2:16
    
my bad, sorry about that. i will encourage you to change your data type in the database where you have stored your date time to varchar so as you can have the null values. – Givelasdougmore Nov 7 '11 at 2:20

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