Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to assign string to bytes array:

var arr [20]byte
str := "abc"
for k, v := range []byte(str) {
  arr[k] = byte(v)
}

Have another method?

share|improve this question
2  
If the length of str is greater than the length of arr then you will get an "index out of range" error. – peterSO Nov 7 '11 at 4:13

Safe and simple:

[]byte("Here is a string....")
share|improve this answer
1  
This answer is wrong: cannot use ([]byte)("abc") (type []byte) as type [20]byte in field value – DavidG Feb 13 at 6:51
    
Best coding practices in Go is using a slice of bytes []byte and not a set array of bytes [20]byte when converting a string to bytes... Don't believe me? Check out Rob Pike's answer on this thread – openwonk Feb 14 at 0:44
    
In case anyone is not familiar with Rob Pike, here are his credentials – openwonk Feb 14 at 0:47
1  
The OP asked about an array, not a slice. In some cases you need to limit the size of the slice and use an array instead. My answer below trims the extra chars to make sure you do not overflow the array. – DavidG Feb 14 at 5:17
1  
@openwonk those credentials are amazing. I hadn't seen that page before, thanks! – mynameismevin Mar 4 at 19:37

For example,

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
    s := "abc"
    var a [20]byte
    copy(a[:], s)
    fmt.Println("s:", []byte(s), "a:", a)
}

Output:

s: [97 98 99] a: [97 98 99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
share|improve this answer

I think it's better..

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
    str := "abc"
    mySlice := []byte(str)
    fmt.Printf("%v -> '%s'",mySlice,mySlice )
}

Check here: http://play.golang.org/p/vpnAWHZZk7

share|improve this answer
1  
It's not better. It's wrong. It doesn't do what the the question asked for. – peterSO Jul 12 '13 at 2:14
    
yeah @peterSO, you're right. – cespinoza Jul 12 '13 at 3:15

Piece of cake:

arr := []byte("That's all folks!!")
share|improve this answer

Ended up creating array specific methods to do this. Much like the encoding/binary package with specific methods for each int type. For example binary.BigEndian.PutUint16([]byte, uint16).

func byte16PutString(s string) [16]byte {
    var a [16]byte
    if len(s) > 16 {
        copy(a[:], s)
    } else {
        copy(a[16-len(s):], s)
    }
    return a
}

var b [16]byte
b = byte16PutString("abc")
fmt.Printf("%v\n", b)

Output:

[0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 97 98 99]

Notice how I wanted padding on the left, not the right.

http://play.golang.org/p/7tNumnJaiN

share|improve this answer

Besides the methods mentioned above, you can also do a trick as

s := "hello"
b := *(*[]byte)(unsafe.Pointer((*reflect.SliceHeader)(unsafe.Pointer(&s))))

Go Play: http://play.golang.org/p/xASsiSpQmC

You should never use this :-)

share|improve this answer
1  
This is crazy. I think it's worth adding "but you should not" at the end of your response. Apart from the fact it doesn't really answer the question (OP talks about bytes array, not slices), you don't seem to get a proper []byte object using your "conversion" – it fails badly when you try to amend p, see: play.golang.org/p/WHGl756ucj. In your case, not sure why you would prefer double-unsafe over the b := []byte(s) method. – tomasz Jul 20 '15 at 11:57
    
@tomasz I'm not prefer to do string <-> []byte in this way, just showing a different option :-) and yes you are right, I misunderstood the question. – Brandon Gao Jul 20 '15 at 16:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.