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I want to assign string to bytes array:

var arr [20]byte
str := "abc"
for k, v := range []byte(str) {
  arr[k] = byte(v)
}

Have another method?

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If the length of str is greater than the length of arr then you will get an "index out of range" error. –  peterSO Nov 7 '11 at 4:13

4 Answers 4

Safe and simple:

[]byte("Here is a string....")
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For example,

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
    s := "abc"
    var a [20]byte
    copy(a[:], s)
    fmt.Println("s:", []byte(s), "a:", a)
}

Output:

s: [97 98 99] a: [97 98 99 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
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I think it's better..

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
    str := "abc"
    mySlice := []byte(str)
    fmt.Printf("%v -> '%s'",mySlice,mySlice )
}

Check here: http://play.golang.org/p/vpnAWHZZk7

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It's not better. It's wrong. It doesn't do what the the question asked for. –  peterSO Jul 12 '13 at 2:14
    
yeah @peterSO, you're right. –  cespinoza Jul 12 '13 at 3:15

Besides the methods mentioned above, you can also do a trick as

s := "hello"
b := *(*[]byte)(unsafe.Pointer((*reflect.SliceHeader)(unsafe.Pointer(&s))))

Go Play: http://play.golang.org/p/xASsiSpQmC

You should never use this :-)

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This is crazy. I think it's worth adding "but you should not" at the end of your response. Apart from the fact it doesn't really answer the question (OP talks about bytes array, not slices), you don't seem to get a proper []byte object using your "conversion" – it fails badly when you try to amend p, see: play.golang.org/p/WHGl756ucj. In your case, not sure why you would prefer double-unsafe over the b := []byte(s) method. –  tomasz Jul 20 at 11:57
    
@tomasz I'm not prefer to do string <-> []byte in this way, just showing a different option :-) and yes you are right, I misunderstood the question. –  Brandon Gao Jul 20 at 16:05

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