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Working on the same project from different machines using bitbucket/github as a central repo, many times I want to check out the most recent changeset in the remote central repo before doing anything from a local machine, is there a way to do that, I would imagine something similar to hg tip but reporting the remote repo instead of the local one. Thanks.

EDIT: I only need the description of the last changeset, rather than the content, just to remind myself what stuffs I committed last time.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

hg incoming will show you what will come if you pull. If you just want the latest change

hg incoming -n -l1

however seeing all of them would be preferable for any use I can think of

you comment about seeing what you committed last time confuses me however as this commit will be in your local repo already presumably (unless you are talking about using different local repos at different revisions?)

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thanks, that does the trick. Yep, I am using different local repos at different revisions, and you are right, simply doing "hg incoming" would be more preferable, I assumed there is only one changeset difference between the local and remote repos when I was asking the question. –  nye17 Nov 7 '11 at 15:04
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Mercurial only clones full repositories, but most hosting sites, including github and bitbucket, make available links to download a tarball of any given revision, including 'tip'.

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I don't need the full repo nor the full package, but only the description of the last commit. –  nye17 Nov 7 '11 at 4:08
    
Ah, I totally didn't get that from your pre-edit question. Glad someone else did. –  Ry4an Nov 7 '11 at 21:29
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