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I have this bit of code:

SELECT Project, Financial_Year, COUNT(*) AS HighRiskCount
INTO #HighRisk 
FROM #TempRisk1
WHERE Risk_1 = 3
GROUP BY Project, Financial_Year

where it's not returning any rows when the count is zero. How do I make these rows appear with the HighRiskCount set as 0?

share|improve this question
    
Can you confirm that data exists having Risk_1 = 3 but with a count of zero? – phatfingers Nov 7 '11 at 4:43
    
How could data exist when the count is zero...? – Adam Robinson Nov 7 '11 at 4:45

You can't select the values from the table when the row count is 0. Where would it get the values for the nonexistent rows?

To do this, you'll have to have another table that defines your list of valid Project and Financial_Year values. You'll then select from this table, perform a left join on your existing table, then do the grouping.

Something like this:

SELECT l.Project, l.Financial_Year, COUNT(t.Project) AS HighRiskCount
INTO #HighRisk 
FROM MasterRiskList l
left join #TempRisk1 t on t.Project = l.Project and t.Financial_Year = l.Financial_Year
WHERE t.Risk_1 = 3
GROUP BY l.Project, l.Financial_Year
share|improve this answer
    
Key point. All the other answers so far miss this. What values would be placed into Project and Financial_Year for the rows when the count is zero? – Jamie F Nov 7 '11 at 4:43
    
It's selecting the project and financial year from the master list, so it will display those when the count is zero I guess. – deutschZuid Nov 10 '11 at 2:30
    
@JamesJiao: The MasterRiskList is something I added to my query as an example; it's not in the OP's query. – Adam Robinson Nov 10 '11 at 2:48
    
I know.. what's what I referred to. – deutschZuid Nov 10 '11 at 2:54

Use:

   SELECT x.Project, x.financial_Year, 
          COUNT(y.*) AS HighRiskCount
     INTO #HighRisk 
     FROM (SELECT DISTINCT t.project, t.financial_year
             FROM #TempRisk1
            WHERE t.Risk_1 = 3) x
LEFT JOIN #TempRisk1 y ON y.project = x.project
                      AND y.financial_year = x.financial_year
 GROUP BY x.Project, x.Financial_Year

The only way to get zero counts is to use an OUTER join against a list of the distinct values you want to see zero counts for.

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Assuming you have your 'Project' and 'Financial_Year' where Risk_1 is different than 3, and those are the ones you intend to include.

SELECT Project, Financial_Year, SUM(CASE WHEN RISK_1 = 3 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS HighRiskCount
INTO #HighRisk 
FROM #TempRisk1
GROUP BY Project, Financial_Year

Notice i removed the where part.

By the way, your current query is not returning null, it is returning no rows.

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SQL generally has a problem returning the values that aren't in a table. To accomplish this (without a stored procedure, in any event), you'll need another table that contains the missing values.

Assuming you want one row per project / financial year combination, you'll need a table that contains each valid Project, Finanical_Year combination:

 SELECT HR.Project, HR.Financial_Year, COUNT(HR.Risk_1) AS HighRiskCount
 INTO #HighRisk HR RIGHT OUTER JOIN ProjectYears PY
   ON HR.Project = PY.Project AND HR.Financial_Year = PY.Financial_Year
 FROM #TempRisk1
 WHERE Risk_1 = 3
 GROUP BY HR.Project, HR.Financial_Year

Note that we're taking advantage of the fact that COUNT() will only count non-NULL values to get a 0 COUNT result for those result set records that are made up only of data from the new ProjectYears table.

Alternatively, you might only one 0 count record to be returned per project (or maybe one per financial_year). You would modify the above solution so that the JOINed table has only that one column.

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Little longer, but what about this as a solution?

IF EXISTS (
        SELECT *
        FROM #TempRisk1
        WHERE Risk_1 = 3
    )
    BEGIN
        SELECT Project, Financial_Year, COUNT(*) AS HighRiskCount
        INTO #HighRisk 
        FROM #TempRisk1
        WHERE Risk_1 = 3
        GROUP BY Project, Financial_Year
    END
ELSE
    BEGIN
        INSERT INTO #HighRisk 
            SELECT 'Project', 'Financial_Year', 0
    END
share|improve this answer

try:

SELECT Project, Financial_Year,  IFNULL(COUNT(*),0)AS HighRiskCount
INTO #HighRisk 
FROM #TempRisk1
WHERE Risk_1 = 3
GROUP BY Project, Financial_Year
share|improve this answer
1  
The OP states there's no row in the result set for IFNULL to operate on. – Larry Lustig Nov 7 '11 at 4:41
    
IFNULL is also not a SQL Server function. You're looking for ISNULL. And, as Larry says, this will not work anyhow. – Adam Robinson Nov 7 '11 at 4:42

MSDN - ISNULL function


SELECT Project, Financial_Year, ISNULL(COUNT(*), 0) AS HighRiskCount
INTO #HighRisk 
FROM #TempRisk1
WHERE Risk_1 = 3
GROUP BY Project, Financial_Year

share|improve this answer
1  
As with the other similar answer, this won't work. Where is it going to get values for Project and Financial_Year if the rows aren't there to provide them? – Adam Robinson Nov 7 '11 at 4:43
    
You're right, I realized this about 3 seconds after I posted. It's times like this I wish there was a way to delete on SO, but I suppose next time I'll take the additional 3 seconds to think before submitting... upvote coming to ya... – Jeremy Wiggins Nov 7 '11 at 4:48

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