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In a language that passes parameters by reference, given the following function:

int function g(x, y) {
  x = x + 1;
  y = y + 2;
  return x + y;
}

If i = 3, and g(i,i) is called, what is value returned? I thought it is 9, is this correct?

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2  
This looks like homework, please tag it as such. – zellio Nov 7 '11 at 5:07
2  
C doesn't have references, and although that typically means "via pointer", there's none in your question. Can you include an actual C function so we can answer your question? In any case, if x and y do somehow refer to the same variable, x + y will always be an even number, as it's equivalent to 2 * x. – GManNickG Nov 7 '11 at 5:09
    
Removed C tag as C does not pass parameters by reference – bdonlan Nov 7 '11 at 5:10
1  
@Mimisbrunnr: Why edit it to make it even less valid C? Let the OP fix his code. – GManNickG Nov 7 '11 at 5:12
1  
@Matt: Hint - if x and y both refer to the same variable, you can just replace both x and y with z and see what the code does. – Eric J. Nov 7 '11 at 5:16

If it's pass-by-reference (your original question was C but C doesn't have pass-by-reference and the question has changed since then anyway, so I'll answer generically), it's probably the case that x and y will simply modify the variables that are passed in for them. That's what a reference is, after all.

In this case, they're both a reference to the same variable i, so your sequence is likely to be:

i = i + 1;       // i becomes 4.
i = i + 2;       // i becomes 6.
return i + i;    // return i + i, or 12.

You can see this in operation with the following C (using pointers to emulate pass-by-reference):

pax$ cat qq.c
#include <stdio.h>

int g(int *x, int *y) {
    *x = *x + 1;
    *y = *y + 2;
    return *x + *y;
}

int main (void) {
    int i = 3;
    int rv = g (&i, &i);
    printf ("Returned: %d\n", rv);
    return 0;
}

pax$ gcc -o qq qq.c ; ./qq
Returned: 12

Your result of 9 seems to be assuming that the references are distinct from one another, such as in the following code:

#include <stdio.h>

int g(int *x, int *y) {
    *x = *x + 1;
    *y = *y + 2;
    return *x + *y;
}

int main (void) {
    int i1 = 3, i2 = 3;
    int rv = g (&i1, &i2);
    printf ("Returned: %d\n", rv);
    return 0;
}

(this does output 9) but that's not usually the case with reference types.

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