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The program

Reads out a textfile and emails it's contents

The original code (with help of Sehe)

https://gist.github.com/1342118#file_test.cpp

The problem:

I am trying to run the application multiple times using threading, using a different textfile for each thread. This means I can no longer use a global vector because thread 3 may add to / alter this vector while thread 1 is still working on it. This means this line is becoming problematic:

curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_READFUNCTION, read_callback);

This calls this function:

static size_t read_callback(void *ptr, size_t size, size_t nmemb, void *userp)
{
  struct WriteThis *pooh = (struct WriteThis *)userp;

  if(size*nmemb < 1)
    return 0;

  if (pooh->counter < text.size())
  {
      const std::string& data = text[pooh->counter];

      memcpy(ptr, data.data(), data.length());
      pooh->counter++; /* advance pointer */
      return data.length();
  }
  return 0; /* no more data left to deliver */
}

As you can see it uses the globally defined vector "text". I thought I could fix it by simply making the vector inside that function (read_callback) but since I'm using threading now, the filename is no longer hard coded so I end up having to pass a variable anyway.

Curl seems to fill in the variables that read_callback accepts automatically so how is this done?

Just to clarify, here's what I have now:

std::vector<string> read_text(char* fname)
{
    std::ifstream myfile (fname);
    std::vector<string> text;

    std::string line;
    while (std::getline(myfile, line))
    {
        text.push_back(line + '\n');
    }

    return text;
}

static size_t read_callback(void *ptr, size_t size, size_t nmemb, void *userp)
{

    std::vector<string> text;
    text = read_text(textfilename);

  struct WriteThis *pooh = (struct WriteThis *)userp;

  if(size*nmemb < 1)
    return 0;

  if (pooh->counter < text.size())
  {
      const std::string& data = text[pooh->counter];

      memcpy(ptr, data.data(), data.length());
      pooh->counter++; /* advance pointer */
      return data.length();
  }
  return 0; /* no more data left to deliver */
}

But read_text doesn't work because textfilename hasn't been passed to the function.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Read carefully again curl_easy_setopt's documentation. You might set the CURLOPT_READDATA to your textfilename and cast the userp to get it inside your read_callback

edit

Your userp is actually used; so you should add the textfilename in a new field of your WriteThis struct. Most callback functions take only one user data, but it should be enough (since you can pack arbitrary stuff in it).

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand what you mean by "cast the userp to get it inside". Googling "libcurl cast userp" brought me back to this question and the documentation doesn't seem to have any info on it either. –  natli Nov 7 '11 at 6:44
    
I've edited my reply. Sorry for not seesn that userp was used. You shoujd just use it more. Perhaps by defining another struct for it. –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 7 '11 at 6:54
    
Thanks allot, that did it! –  natli Nov 7 '11 at 7:01

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