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column1 column2
x       y
y       x

how does one go about eliminating such duplicates? or at worst selecting just one of those tuples?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

One approach is to identify only the valid rows e.g.

SELECT column1, column2
  FROM T
 WHERE column1 <= column2
UNION
SELECT column2 AS column1, column1 AS column2
  FROM T
 WHERE column1 > column2;

...then delete rows that aren't in the set of valid rows:

DELETE 
  FROM T
 WHERE NOT EXISTS (
                   SELECT *
                     FROM (
                           SELECT column1, column2
                             FROM T
                            WHERE column1 <= column2
                           UNION
                           SELECT column2 AS column1, column1 AS column2
                             FROM T
                            WHERE column1 > column2
                          ) AS DT1
                    WHERE DT1.column1 = T.column1 
                          AND DT1.column2 = T.column2
                  );

Alternatively, the DELETE may be simplified to target only the invalid rows:

DELETE 
  FROM T
 WHERE column1 > column2
       AND EXISTS (
                   SELECT *
                     FROM T AS T1
                    WHERE T1.column1 = T.column2 
                          AND T1.column2 = T.column1
                  );
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It's become kind of a mainstream habit among question askers to withhold the information which RDBMS we are dealing with. In response: this is tested and works with a certain RDBMS I am not inclined to name. Go figure!

DELETE FROM tbl a
USING  tbl b
WHERE  (a.x, a.y) = (b.y, b.x)
AND    a.y > a.x  -- keep the one dupe with the biggest x

Assuming there are no dupes with x = y. This would be an ordinary duplicate anyway.

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1  
The thing is i don't know which RDBMS they are use either,i'm doing an online course which only mentions that we will be using SQL(which i mentioned in the question itself) thank you for the answer anyway –  Ashwin Nov 7 '11 at 6:44
1  
@Ashwin: Sorry for the attitude. You just happen to be caught up in something. :) It's so much easier to answer if we know the RDBMS. My solution works in PostgreSQL where you can join in additional tables to a DELETE with USING. Some other RDBMS use other techniques. –  Erwin Brandstetter Nov 7 '11 at 6:56
    
It's become kind of a mainstream habit to use the term "relational" (the 'R' in 'RDBMS') when one means 'SQL'. The Standard SQL specs purposely avoid the use of the word 'relation' and its derivatives. –  onedaywhen Nov 7 '11 at 10:20
    
...speaking of Standards, using a correlation name (for which it's become kind of a mainstream habit to use the term "alias") should have the effect of materializing a table which immediately goes out of scope i.e. the base tables would remain unaffected, which is surely not the OP's intention. Therefore, your SQL statement is wrong as regards 'sql'. –  onedaywhen Nov 7 '11 at 10:24
    
The syntax is for PostgreSQL and the alias is an alias, not a correlation. Consult the fine manual here. Nothing goes out of scope, my statement is perfectly correct. –  Erwin Brandstetter Nov 7 '11 at 18:34

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