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This is an interview problem that I am stuck on:

Given a string consisting of a, b and c's, we can perform the following operation: Take any two adjacent distinct characters and replace it with the third character. For example, if 'a' and 'c' are adjacent, they can replaced with 'b'. What is the smallest string which can result by applying this operation repeatedly?

My attempted solution:

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.FileNotFoundException;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.util.LinkedList;
import java.util.List;

public class Solution {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(
                    System.in));

            System.out.println(solve(in.readLine()));

            in.close();
        } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    private static int solve(String testCase) {
        LinkedList<String> temp = new LinkedList<String>(deconstruct(testCase));

        for (int i = 0; i < (temp.size() - 1); i++) {
            if (!temp.get(i).equals(temp.get(i + 1))) {
                temp.add(i, getThirdChar(temp.remove(), temp.remove()));
                i = -1;
            }
        }

        return reconstruct(temp).length();
    }

    private static List<String> deconstruct(String testCase) {
        List<String> temp = new LinkedList<String>();

        for (int i = 0; i < testCase.length(); i++) {
            temp.add(testCase.charAt(i) + "");
        }

        return temp;
    }

    private static String reconstruct(List<String> temp) {
        String testCase = "";

        for (int i = 0; i < temp.size(); i++) {
            testCase += temp.get(i);
        }

        return testCase;
    }

    private static String getThirdChar(String firstChar, String secondChar) {
        return "abc".replaceAll("[" + firstChar + secondChar + "]+", "");
    }
}

The code seems to work fine on test inputs "cab" (prints "2"), "bcab" (prints "1"), and "ccccc" (prints "5"). But I keep getting told that my code is wrong. Can anyone help me figure out where the bug is?

share|improve this question
3  
this is not a programmer problem. The answer is: a single character. E.g. 'abbccaacba' -> 'cabbc' -> 'bba' -> 'bc' -> 'a' – sehe Nov 7 '11 at 7:01
    
How does the bug manifest itself? Is it a bug in logic, or is it a "bug" as in the code could be better, or...? – Dave Newton Nov 7 '11 at 7:02
1  
@sehe That's the smallest that could be produced, but it doesn't mean that all inputs will produce it. – Dave Newton Nov 7 '11 at 7:03
    
@DaveNewton: I know but What is the smallest string which can result by applying this operation repeatedly? is a bogus question if it wasn't the general case, at least without specifying input :) Also, I forgot to mention the case of the empty input sequence. It will be shorter by 1 character still – sehe Nov 7 '11 at 7:24
2  
I do not understand. The answer to this question is a number, not a piece of code. – EJP Nov 7 '11 at 8:02
up vote 37 down vote accepted

As people have already pointed out the error is that your algorithm makes the substitutions in a predefined order. Your algorithm would make the transformation:

abcc --> ccc instead of abcc --> aac --> ab --> c

If you want to use the technique of generating the reduced strings, you need to either:

  • Perform substitutions on one level in all the orders imaginable (instead of only one predefined iteration order)
  • Find a smart way of deciding which substitution will yield the shortest string in the end

If all you need is the length of the reduced string, there is however a much simpler implementation which does not require the reduced strings to be generated. This is an extended version of @Matteo's answer, with some more details and a working (very simplistic) algorithm.

Simple properties

I postulate that the following three properties are true about abc-strings under the given set of rules.

  1. If it is impossible to reduce a string further, all the characters in that string must be the same character.

  2. It is impossible that: 2 < answer < string.length is true

  3. While performing a reduction operation, if the counts of each letter prior to the operation is even, the count of each letter after the operation will be odd. Conversely, if the counts of each letter is odd prior to the operation, the counts will be even after the operation.

Property 1

Property one is trivial.

Property 2 (example to illustrate)

Assume: we have a reduced string of length 5 which can be reduced no more.

AAAAA

As this string is the result of a reduction operation, the previous string must've contained one B and one C. Following are some examples of possible "parent strings":

BCAAAA, AABCAA, AAACBA

For all of the possible parent strings we can easily see that at least one of the C:s and the B:s can be combined with A:s instead of each other. This will result in a string of length 5 which will be further reducible. Hence, we have illustrated that the only reason for which we had an irreducible string of length 5 was that we had made incorrect choice of which characters to combine while performing the reduction operation.

This reasoning applies for all reduced strings of any length k such that 2 < k < string.length.

Property 3 (example to illustrate)

If we have for example [numA, numB, numC] = [even, even, even] and perform a reduction operation in which we substitute AB with a C. The count of A and B will decrease by one, making the counts odd, while the count of C will increase by one, making that count odd as well.

Similarly to this, if two counts are even and one is odd, two counts will be odd and one even after the operation and vice versa.

In other words, if all three counts have the same "evenness", no reduction operation can change that. And, if there are differences in the "evenness" of the counts, no reduction operation can change that.

Drawing conclusions which result from the properties

Consider the two irreducible strings:

A and AA

For A notice that [numA, numB, numC] = [odd, even, even] For AA notice that [numA, numB, numC] = [even, even, even]

Now forget those two strings and assume we are given an input string of length n.

If all characters in the string are equal, the answer is obviously string.length.

Else, we know from property 2 that it is possible to reduce the string to a length smaller than 3. We also know the effect on evenness of performing reduction operations. If the input string contains even counts of all letters or odd count of all letters, it is impossible to reduce it to a single letter string, since it is impossible to change the evenness structure from [even, even, even] to [odd, even, even] by performing reduction operation.

Hence a simpler algorithm would be as follows:

Algorithm

Count the number of occurences of each letter in the input string [numA, numB, numC]

If two of these counts are 0, then return string.length

Else if (all counts are even) or (all counts are odd), then return 2

Else, then return 1
share|improve this answer
    
1  
This is a good approach. The explanation is clear and overall, the answer is awesome. – Shankar Sep 29 '15 at 20:12

In my opinion, the answer is a number (or a program that generates a number) and not a program that applies the described transformation.

For this reason, (if the string is not empty) the answer would be 1 with several inputs.

However if the input is composed of a single character repeated several times, the string cannot be elaborated, hence the output string would be the same as the input string (i.e., same length).

Note that the input string must be composed of a single character; if it has two characters, the output would be 1: baaaa -> caaa -> baa -> ca -> b

Note that the sequence of replacements has not been specified, (if more than 1 replacements is available). Hence we cannot say a lot more, but we can observe that some strings not composed of a single characters cannot be reduced to a string of length 1. This is the case when all the three letters appear in sequence (e.g., abc). When this string is processed, the output would be a string of two equal characters (e.g., cc or aa) which cannot be reduced even more.

share|improve this answer
    
Yup. My point exactly. I'm afraid the OP (and others) weren't very appreciative of this line of thinking :) – sehe Nov 7 '11 at 8:40
    
I think you're meant to read the question 'Given a string blah, what is the shortest output', i.e. provide a solver rather than a solution. The question is grammatically borked, but I think that's what the interviewer is trying to ask. – laher Nov 7 '11 at 8:45
    
@sehe I agree :-) – Matteo Nov 7 '11 at 8:50
    
@amir75 if you want to provide a solution, you should also focus on the SMALLEST string... how do you select the transformation to apply when there are several available? For example, "abcc" can have "ABcc" -> "ccc" or "aBCc" -> "aAC" -> "AB" -> "c". Before start coding, a comprehension phase is needed and you have to break the problem! – Matteo Nov 7 '11 at 8:50
1  
True. When the requirement is unclear or vague, and you can't get better info, you sometimes just have to make a call, and I guess we called differently. It's important to state your assumptions, which you have done :) – laher Nov 7 '11 at 8:56

Your use of LinkedList is interesting (and potentially unexpected), but some of the other aspects are a bit strange & distracting ...

My first instinct would have been to repeatedly loop over the String, replacing characters into a StringBuilder - with a while loop surrounding the foor loop (as suggested by sehe). This may be what the interviewer was expecting, rather than your clever use of LinkedList.

The interviewer may be distracted by these other aspects. e.g.:

  1. why not use a LinkedList<Character> instead of LinkedList<String>.
  2. why not return a LinkedList directly from deconstruct(String). No need to wrap it.
  3. You don't really need a reconstruct() method. Just use temp.size()
  4. Regex is a bit of an undesirable way to get the third char. I can't think of a one-liner, but you could use an array, like so:

    private static Character getThirdChar(Character firstChar, Character secondChar) {
        List<Character> li= new ArrayList<Character>(Arrays.asList('a', 'b', 'c'));
        li.remove(firstChar);
        li.remove(secondChar); 
        return li.get(0);
    }
    

After these edits, the interviewer might be able to focus more clearly on your very interesting solution.

EDIT: perhaps the question is asking you to return the smallest string itself, not its length. I think last line of the interview question ought to read as follows: "For the given string, return the smallest string which can result by applying this operation repeatedly"

HTH

share|improve this answer
    
good comments. don't forget input validation – sehe Nov 7 '11 at 8:17
    
True, it wouldn't hurt! – laher Nov 7 '11 at 8:30

Edit For fun I did my own version that operates on a char[] in-place:

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(solve("abbccaacba"));
    }

    private static int solve(String testCase) {
        if (!testCase.matches("^[abc]*$"))
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("invalid input");

        char[] chars = new char[testCase.length()];
        testCase.getChars(0, testCase.length(), chars, 0);

        int remaining = chars.length;

        for (int i=0; (i<chars.length) && (remaining>1);)
        {
            int next = i+1;
            while (next < chars.length && (' '==chars[next]))
                ++next;

            if (next >= chars.length)
                break;

            if (chars[i]!=chars[next])
            {
                switch (chars[i])
                {
                    case 'a': chars[next] = ('b'==chars[next])? 'c':'b'; break;
                    case 'b': chars[next] = ('a'==chars[next])? 'c':'a'; break;
                    case 'c': chars[next] = ('b'==chars[next])? 'a':'b'; break;
                }
                chars[i] = ' '; // mark as removed
                remaining--;

                while (i>0 && (' '!=chars[i-1]))
                    --i;
                if (' '==chars[i])
                    i = next;
            }
            else
                ++i;
        }

        return remaining;
    }
}

See it live on http://ideone.com/yhK9t, with debug output:

a<bbccaacba
 c<bccaacba
  a<ccaacba
   b<caacba
    a<aacba
    aa<acba
    aaa<cba
    a<a bba
    aa< bba
    a<  cba
       b<ba
       bb<a
       b< c
         a<
         a Done.
1

Still do note caveats I mentioned in my comments: EDIT Huh, somehow I borked a comment saying that the answers would vary depending on the order of substitutions

  • left to right or right-to-left (my version uses left-to-right)
  • depth-first (or breadth-first) (my version uses depth-first)
share|improve this answer
    
@amir75: I have gamed a little implementation that should be a lot more efficient as it never reallocates and works linearly from left to right, in a single pass. – sehe Nov 7 '11 at 8:34
    
Hi Sehe, regarding your original answer, there wouldn't be any gain from adding an outer while loop, because he's returning to the start of the LinkedList (i=-1) after each match+replacement. – laher Nov 7 '11 at 8:39
    
@amir75: see. I should have seen/tested that. Striking my original quib!. Honestly, then I think the question is just under-specified and the the failing testcases are due to substitution order or input validation – sehe Nov 7 '11 at 8:45
    
yeah, I agree the question is horribly worded, but I was completely intrigued by OP's use of LinkedList. I thought it was a nice idea .. perhaps i-=1 would have been more efficient than i=-1 though :) – laher Nov 7 '11 at 8:51

Pattern matching in Scala makes it easier to pick apart lists of items like this. To reduce the string:

  def reduce[T](xs: List[T]): List[T] = {
    def reduceImpl(xs1: List[T], accumulator: List[T] = List.empty): List[T] = {
      xs1 match {
        case w :: x :: y :: tail if (w != x) =>
          if (w != x) reduceImpl(y :: tail, accumulator)
          else reduceImpl(x :: y :: tail, w :: accumulator)
        case remainder =>
          remainder.reverse ::: accumulator
      }
    }
    reduceImpl(xs).reverse
  }

And then you can just call length on the result.

And yes, I'd give this answer for a Java question. 99 times out of 100 the interviewer couldn't care less what language you use to talk about code, and using things like Scala, Clojure, F# etc are the right way to go. (Or if not, they're the right way to figure out you don't actually want to work there.)

(And also yes, the people who said the answer is a number are correct. However, like everyone else said, this is more about an interview question, and it's probably correct to say that what they asked isn't what they wanted to ask. It's a (small) bad sign for working there if this is a standard question they use more than once. If they're using this question in an automated screen, that's really not a good sign.)

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This is one of the sample questions on InteviewStreet. I tried solving it in Java and my code produces the expected results for the three test cases given, but then only passes one of the ten actual test cases. I'm a lot rusty in programming and in Java but this is what I came up with to solve the three given examples...

I can't get the code formatting just right...

import java.io.*;
import java.util.Scanner;
public class Solution
{
    public String transform(String input)
    {
        String output = new String(input);
        // System.out.println(input);
        if(output.length() > 1)
        {
            int i = 0;
            while (i < (output.length() - 1))
            {
                if(output.charAt(i) != output.charAt(i+1))
                {
                    StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
                    if (output.charAt(i) == 'a')
                    {
                        // next character is b or c
                        if (output.charAt(i+1) == 'b')
                        {
                            sb.append('c');
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            sb.append('b');
                        }
                    }
                    else if (output.charAt(i) == 'b')
                    {
                        // next character is a or c
                        if (output.charAt(i+1) == 'a')
                        {
                            sb.append('c');
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            sb.append('a');
                        }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        // next character is a or b
                        if (output.charAt(i+1) == 'a')
                        {
                            sb.append('b');
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            sb.append('a');
                        }
                    }
                    String remainder = output.substring(i+2);
                    if (remainder.length() > 0)
                    {
                        sb.append(remainder);
                    }
                    Solution anotherAnswer = new Solution();
                    output = anotherAnswer.transform(sb.toString());

                } 
                i++;
            }
        }

        return output;
    }


    /**
     * @param args
     * @throws Exception 
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception
    {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        Scanner sc;
        try
        {
            sc = new Scanner(new BufferedReader(new FileReader("input.txt")));
            // sc = new Scanner(System.in);
            int numberOfTests = sc.nextInt();
            for (int i = 1; i <= numberOfTests; i++)
            {
                String testData = sc.next();
                Solution answer = new Solution();
                String transformedData = answer.transform(testData);
                System.out.println(transformedData.length());
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e) 
        {
            throw new Exception(e);
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
My attempted solution forgot to append the start of the string before swapping out the third character for the two adjacent and recalling my method recursively. It was a one line fix I thought of after I'd stepped away from the problem for a while, alas it still doesn't solve all the tests, though it solves the ones I make up for it. The line need is sb.append(output.substring(0, i)); just after the StringBuffer is created. – Muskie Nov 21 '11 at 18:21
import java.io.BufferedReader; 
import java.io.InputStreamReader;

class Solution {

    public static void main(String args[]) throws Exception {   

        BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));

        int T = Integer.parseInt(in.readLine());

        for (int i = 0; i < T; i++) {
            String line = in.readLine();
            System.out.println(solve(line));
        }
    }

    public static int[] countOccurrences(String input) {

        int r[] = new int[3];
        char inputArr[] = input.toCharArray();

        for (int i = 0; i < inputArr.length; i++) {

            if (inputArr[i] == 'a') {
                r[0]++;
            } 
            else if (inputArr[i] == 'b') {
                r[1]++;
            }
            else if(inputArr[i] == 'c') {
                r[2]++;
            }
        }
        return r;
    }

    private static int solve(String input) {
        int num[] = countOccurrences(input);

        if ((num[0]==0 && num[1]==0 )||(num[0]==0 && num[2]==0 )||(num[1]==0 && num[2]==0 )) {
            return input.length();
        }
        if((num[0]%2==0 && num[1]%2==0 && num[2]%2==0)||(num[0]%2==1 && num[1]%2==1 && num[2]%2==1)) {
            return 2;
        }

        return 1;
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Please fix formatting. – Damian Jeżewski Mar 21 '13 at 12:16

This problem also appears in HackerRank as an introduction to Dynamic Programming. Even though there are nice close-form solution as many posters have already suggested, I find it helpful to still work it out using the good-old dynamic programming way. i.e. find a good recurrence relation and cache intermediate results to avoid unnecessary computations.

As some people have already noted, the brute-force method of iterating through consecutive letters of the input string and all the resulting reduced strings will not work when input string is long. Such solution will only pass one test-case on HackerRank. Storing all reduced strings are also not feasible as the number of such string can grow exponentially. I benefit from some people's comments that the order of the letters does not matter, and only the numbers of each letter matter.

Each string can be reduced as long as it has more than one of two distinct letters. Each time a string is reduced, 1 of each of the distinct letters goes away and a letter of the third kind is added to the string. This gives us an recurrence relation. Let f(a,b,c) be the length of the smallest string given a of the letter 'a', b of the letter 'b', and c of the letter 'c' in the input string, then

f(a,b,c) = min(f(a-1,b-1,c+1), f(a-1,b+1,c-1), f(a+1,b-1,c-1));

since there are three possibilities when we reduce a string. Of course, every recurrence relation is subject to some initial conditions. In this case, we have

if(a < 0 || b < 0 || c < 0)
    return MAX_SIZE+1;
if(a == 0 && b == 0 && c == 0)
    return 0;
if(a != 0 && b == 0 && c == 0)
    return a;
if(a == 0 && b != 0 && c == 0)
    return b;
if(a == 0 && b == 0 && c != 0)
    return c;

here MAX_SIZE is the maximum number of a given letter in the HackerRank problem. Anytime we run out of a given letter, the maximum size is returned to indicate that this string reduction is invalid. We can then compute the size of the smallest reduced string using these initial conditions and the recurrence relation.

However, this will still not pass the HackerRank test cases. Also, this incurs too many repeated calculations. Therefore, we want to cache the computed result given the tuple (a,b,c). The fact that we can cache the result is due to the fact that the order of the letters does not change the answer, as many of the posts above have proved.

My solution is posted below

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <assert.h>

#define MAX_SIZE 101

int cache[MAX_SIZE][MAX_SIZE][MAX_SIZE];

void init_cache() {
    for(int i = 0 ; i < MAX_SIZE; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < MAX_SIZE; j++) {
            for(int k = 0; k < MAX_SIZE; k++)
                cache[i][j][k] = -1;
        }
    }
}

void count(char* array, int* a, int* b, int* c) {
    int len = strlen(array);

    for(int i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        if(array[i] == 'a')
            (*a)++;
        else if(array[i] == 'b')
            (*b)++;
        else
            (*c)++;
    }
}

int solve(int a, int b, int c) {
    if(a < 0 || b < 0 || c < 0)
        return MAX_SIZE+1;
    if(a == 0 && b == 0 && c == 0)
        return 0;
    if(a != 0 && b == 0 && c == 0)
        return a;
    if(a == 0 && b != 0 && c == 0)
        return b;
    if(a == 0 && b == 0 && c != 0)
        return c;
    if(cache[a][b][c] != -1) {
        return cache[a][b][c];
    }
    int ci = solve(a-1, b-1, c+1);
    int bi = solve(a-1, b+1, c-1);
    int ai = solve(a+1, b-1, c-1);
    if(a > 0 && b > 0)
        cache[a-1][b-1][c+1] = ci;
    if(a > 0 && c > 0)
        cache[a-1][b+1][c-1] = bi;
    if(b > 0 && c > 0)
        cache[a+1][b-1][c-1] = ai;
    return ci < bi ? (ci < ai ? ci : ai) : (ai < bi ? ai : bi);
}

int main() {
    int res, T, i;
    scanf("%d", &T);
    assert(T<=100);

    char arr[100001];

    init_cache();

    for(i = 0; i < T; i++) {
        scanf("%s",arr);

        int a = 0;
        int b = 0;
        int c = 0;
        count(arr, &a, &b, &c);

        int len = solve(a, b, c);
        printf("%d\n", len);  
    }

    return 0;
}
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