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[I already posted something very similar but the question wasn't good, here is what I really wanna know]

I got the following code that generates a DLL :

public class MyObject : DependencyObject
{
}


public class Timer : DependencyObject
{
}

public class AnotherClass
{
}

public class Test
{
    MyObject q1 = new MyObject();
    MyObject q2 = new MyObject();
    MyObject q3 = new MyObject();
    MyObject q4 = new MyObject();

    Timer t1 = new Timer();
    Timer t2 = new Timer();
    Timer t3 = new Timer();

    AnotherClass a1 = new AnotherClass();
    AnotherClass a2 = new AnotherClass();
    AnotherClass a3 = new AnotherClass();
    }
}

Then I'd like to extract instances from my DLL file. Here is what I got for the moment :

var library = Assembly.LoadFrom(libraryPath);

But then, I havent any idea about how to extract my 10 instances (4 MyObjects, 3 Timers & 3 AnotherClasses). The only thing I managed to get is the 4 classes (MyObject, Timer, AnotherClass and Test) with the code :

IEnumerable<Type> types = library.GetTypes();

but I think this is not the way I'll get my 10 instances...

(ps : I'm not even sure that the 10 instances are contained in my DLL file...)

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2  
Can you not just reference your dll in the consuming project, and then use it as you would any other class library? –  Darren Young Nov 7 '11 at 9:01
    
Nop, I can as I will dynamicaly load any dll in a specific folder :/ –  Guillaume Slashy Nov 7 '11 at 9:03
    
Is there a specific reason you are doing that, rather than including the dll as part of your project? –  Darren Young Nov 7 '11 at 9:05
    
The "10 instances" here are actually "per instance of Test, of which there could be any number (more than likely: zero), and I know I could create an instance of Test without any of the child objects (i.e. where q1 etc are all null). There's a lot of assumptions in here that simply don't hold much water. –  Marc Gravell Nov 7 '11 at 9:06
1  
" I'm not even sure that the 10 instances are contained in my DLL file" instances, conceptually, only makes sense in memory; the file just contains IL metadata. –  Marc Gravell Nov 7 '11 at 9:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You cannot easily get all instances of a given type. That simply doesn't exist, outside of some pretty hardcore debugging APIs (think: SOS). If you need this, you should think of some other, manageable way of tracking your instances (ideally without keeping them alive, so WeakReference).

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+1 there are some good frameworks out there for managing external objects ie MEF > mef.codeplex.com –  MattDavey Nov 7 '11 at 9:32

You need to instantiate an instance of Test. Those instances won't exist until you do.

Now, I suspect what you really want to do is have a singleton (a frowned upon design pattern for a number of reasons). However, this is what you'd do if you want it:

public class Test
{
    private static Test instance_ = new Test();

    MyObject q1 = new MyObject();
    MyObject q2 = new MyObject();
    MyObject q3 = new MyObject();
    MyObject q4 = new MyObject();

    Timer t1 = new Timer();
    Timer t2 = new Timer();
    Timer t3 = new Timer();

    AnotherClass a1 = new AnotherClass();
    AnotherClass a2 = new AnotherClass();
    AnotherClass a3 = new AnotherClass();

    public Test Instance { get { return instance_; } }
}

Now, assuming you make those members publically available, you can get at them with:

Test.Instance.a1;  // etc...

Now, as I've said singletons aren't generally a good idea. It would be better to instantiate your own instance of Test from your dependent module and work with that.

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