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I noticed an empty comment block in JSONP output returned by facebook graph api for all methods.

URL that I called :

https://graph.facebook.com/NUMERIC_FACEBOOK_ID/friends?access_token=ACCESS_TOKEN_STRING&callback=theGreatFunction

The JSONP output is :

/**/ theGreatFunction({
   "data": [
      {
         "name": "First Friend",
         "id": "XXXX"
      },
      {
         "name": "Second Friend",
         "id": "XXXXXX"
      },
     ........

My question is : What does the empty comment block /* */ before the callback function signify ? Does it have a peculiar purpose ? Does it fix any known javascript gotcha ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

We added this to protect against an attack where a third party site bypasses the content-type of the response by doing:

<object type="application/x-shockwave-flash"
 data="http://graph.facebook.com?callback=[specifically crafted flash bytes]">
</object>

Google does something similar, except they use //... + \n (e.g. http://www.google.com/calendar/feeds/developer-calendar@google.com/public/full?alt=json&callback=foo)

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How does empty comment block help against this attack, I could not understand ? –  DhruvPathak Apr 17 '13 at 6:40
2  
Without the comment block, the jsonp response can be re-interpreted as action script (flash) code. The swf file format states that the first 3 bytes must be FWS or CWS. The empty comment prevents this. –  Alok Apr 25 '13 at 15:40

Could be some kind of seperator to have a fixed start. I guess Facebook had a reason to but it there but we can only guess and it does not really matter does it? :)

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it would be good to know a reason if there is some. Like it might be there to fix some javascript gotcha etc. –  DhruvPathak Nov 7 '11 at 9:24

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