Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm in the phase of learning OOP in PHP and i wanna know how to call a variable from another PHP class.

eg.

class first {
    public $var1 = 1;
}

I guess it's this way but i don't know how to continue:

$first = new $first();

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You should do something like this:

$first = new first();
echo $first->var1;
share|improve this answer
    
@xdazz thanks! <3 –  FBwall Nov 8 '11 at 10:08

You need to call it like this:

$first = new first();
$first->var1;
share|improve this answer

For better way make like this:

class first {
    private $var1 = 1;
    function getVar(){
        return $this->var1;
    }

    function setVar($value){
         $this->var1 = $value;
    }
}

Or like this:

class first {
    private $var1 = 1;
    function __get(){
        return $this->var1;
    }

    function __set($key,$value){
         $this->$key = $value;
    }
}

In this case you may try handling some exceptions.

Manual: http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.overloading.php#language.oop5.overloading.members

share|improve this answer
    
Using getter and setter functions is better OOP design, because it abstracts away internal representation from external access. For example, if you wrote a lot of code that depended on var1, but later decided to change the variable name to something else, then all the external code would break. –  Gustav Bertram Nov 7 '11 at 10:31
    
This is a question how you want to make the value accessible (e.g. read/write) and if you want to allow to change the value w/o the class noticing it. It's not better per-se, see as well javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-09-2003/jw-0905-toolbox.html which has a provocative title but is about a lot of decisions that play a role. –  hakre Nov 7 '11 at 11:04

You will need to create an instance of the class:

$instance=new first();

and then you can access the variable from that instance:

$var=$instance->var1;

Note - there is no $ before the class name when you create an instance of it.

share|improve this answer
<?php

class Myname 
{
   public static $name='Your First Name';
}
class Mylast
{
   public static $last='Your Last Name';
}
class Fullname
{

     public static function staticValue() {
        return Myname::$name."--".Mylast::$last;
    }
}

print Fullname::staticValue() . "\n";
?>
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.